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Article

Affected Others Responsivity to Gambling Harm: An International Taxonomy of Consumer-Derived Behaviour Change Techniques

1
School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
2
School of Psychology, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia
3
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
4
Eastern Health Clinical School and Monash Addiction Research Centre, Monash University, 5 Arnold St, Box Hill, VIC 3800, Australia
5
Turning Point, Eastern Health, 110 Church St, Richmond, VIC 3121, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Marta Torrens
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(4), 583; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10040583
Received: 7 December 2020 / Revised: 29 January 2021 / Accepted: 31 January 2021 / Published: 4 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gambling, Gaming and Other Behavioural Addictions)
Affected others impacted by someone else’s gambling utilise numerous behaviour change strategies to minimise gambling-related harm but knowledge on what these strategies are and how they are implemented is limited. This study aimed to develop a comprehensive data-driven taxonomy of the types of self-help strategies used by affected others, and to categorize these into high-level behaviour change techniques (BCTs). Two taxonomies were developed using an inductive and deductive approach which was applied to a dataset of online sources and organised into the Rubicon model of action phases. These taxonomies were family-focused (how to reduce the impact of gambling harm on families) and gambler-focused (how to support the gambler in behaviour change). In total, 329 online sources containing 3536 different strategies were identified. The family-focused classification contained 16 BCTs, and the most frequent were professional support, financial management and planned consequences. The gambler-focused classification contained 11 BCTs, and the most frequent were feedback on behaviours, professional support and financial management. The majority of family- and gambler-focused BCTs fell under the actional phase of the Rubicon model. Grounded in lived experience, the findings highlight the need for intervention and resource development that includes a wide range of specific techniques that affected others can utilise. View Full-Text
Keywords: self-help; concerned significant others; treatment; behaviour change; behaviour change techniques; gambling harm self-help; concerned significant others; treatment; behaviour change; behaviour change techniques; gambling harm
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MDPI and ACS Style

Booth, N.; Dowling, N.A.; Landon, J.; Lubman, D.I.; Merkouris, S.S.; Rodda, S.N. Affected Others Responsivity to Gambling Harm: An International Taxonomy of Consumer-Derived Behaviour Change Techniques. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 583. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10040583

AMA Style

Booth N, Dowling NA, Landon J, Lubman DI, Merkouris SS, Rodda SN. Affected Others Responsivity to Gambling Harm: An International Taxonomy of Consumer-Derived Behaviour Change Techniques. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2021; 10(4):583. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10040583

Chicago/Turabian Style

Booth, Natalia, Nicki A. Dowling, Jason Landon, Dan I. Lubman, Stephanie S. Merkouris, and Simone N. Rodda 2021. "Affected Others Responsivity to Gambling Harm: An International Taxonomy of Consumer-Derived Behaviour Change Techniques" Journal of Clinical Medicine 10, no. 4: 583. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10040583

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