Next Article in Journal
The Impact of COVID-19 on In-Hospital Outcomes of ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Patients
Next Article in Special Issue
Red Blood Cell Distribution Width, Disease Severity, and Mortality in Hospitalized Patients with SARS-CoV-2 Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Previous Article in Journal
Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Biomarker Expression in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients
Previous Article in Special Issue
Proposal of the Definition for COVID-19-Associated Coagulopathy
Review

Severe COVID-19 Lung Infection in Older People and Periodontitis

1
Independent Researcher, Rochester, MN 55902, USA
2
Instituto de Odontoestomatología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia 5090000, Chile
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(2), 279; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10020279
Received: 11 November 2020 / Revised: 31 December 2020 / Accepted: 12 January 2021 / Published: 14 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue COVID-19: From Pathophysiology to Clinical Practice)
Periodontal bacteria dissemination into the lower respiratory tract may create favorable conditions for severe COVID-19 lung infection. Once lung tissues are colonized, cells that survive persistent bacterial infection can undergo permanent damage and accelerated cellular senescence. Consequently, several morphological and functional features of senescent lung cells facilitate SARS-CoV-2 replication. The higher risk for severe SARS-CoV-2 infection, the virus that causes COVID-19, and death in older patients has generated the question whether basic aging mechanisms could be implicated in such susceptibility. Mounting evidence indicates that cellular senescence, a manifestation of aging at the cellular level, contributes to the development of age-related lung pathologies and facilitates respiratory infections. Apparently, a relationship between life-threatening COVID-19 lung infection and pre-existing periodontal disease seems improbable. However, periodontal pathogens can be inoculated during endotracheal intubation and/or aspirated into the lower respiratory tract. This review focuses on how the dissemination of periodontal bacteria into the lungs could aggravate age-related senescent cell accumulation and facilitate more efficient SARS-CoV-2 cell attachment and replication. We also consider how periodontal bacteria-induced premature senescence could influence the course of COVID-19 lung infection. Finally, we highlight the role of saliva as a reservoir for both pathogenic bacteria and SARS-CoV-2. Therefore, the identification of active severe periodontitis can be an opportune and valid clinical parameter for risk stratification of old patients with COVID-19. View Full-Text
Keywords: periodontitis; periodontal disease; oral bacteria; Porphyromonas gingivalis; LPS; pneumonia; lung; COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; cellular senescence periodontitis; periodontal disease; oral bacteria; Porphyromonas gingivalis; LPS; pneumonia; lung; COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; cellular senescence
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Aquino-Martinez, R.; Hernández-Vigueras, S. Severe COVID-19 Lung Infection in Older People and Periodontitis. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 279. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10020279

AMA Style

Aquino-Martinez R, Hernández-Vigueras S. Severe COVID-19 Lung Infection in Older People and Periodontitis. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2021; 10(2):279. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10020279

Chicago/Turabian Style

Aquino-Martinez, Ruben, and Scarlette Hernández-Vigueras. 2021. "Severe COVID-19 Lung Infection in Older People and Periodontitis" Journal of Clinical Medicine 10, no. 2: 279. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10020279

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop