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Brief Report

Prepregnancy Assessment of Liver Function to Predict Perinatal and Postpregnancy Outcomes in Biliary Atresia Patients with Native Liver

1
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Tatsuo Kanda
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(17), 3956; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10173956
Received: 6 August 2021 / Revised: 24 August 2021 / Accepted: 31 August 2021 / Published: 31 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection Biliary Atresia: Aetiology, Diagnosis and Treatment)
Considering that some biliary atresia (BA) survivors with native liver have reached reproductive age and face long-lasting complications, specific attention needs to be paid to pregnant cases. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between liver function, perinatal outcomes, and prognosis. A database review was conducted to identify pregnant BA cases with native liver and perinatal data, and clinical information on BA-related complications was analyzed. Perinatal serum cholinesterase (ChE) levels, model for end-stage liver-disease (MELD) score, and platelet trends were analyzed, and the association between these indicators and perinatal outcomes was investigated. Patients were categorized into three groups according to the perinatal clinical outcomes: favorable (term babies with or without several episodes of cholangitis; n = 3), borderline (term baby and following liver dysfunction; n = 1), and unfavorable (premature delivery with subsequent liver failure; n = 1). Lower serum ChE levels, lower platelet counts, and higher MELD scores were observed in the unfavorable category. Borderline and unfavorable patients displayed a continuous increase in MELD score, with one eventually needing a liver transplantation. Pregnancy in patients with BA requires special attention. Serum ChE levels, platelet counts, and MELD scores are all important markers for predicting perinatal prognosis. View Full-Text
Keywords: pregnancy; biliary atresia; chorine esterase; MELD score; liver transplantation pregnancy; biliary atresia; chorine esterase; MELD score; liver transplantation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Takahashi, N.; Ochiai, D.; Yamada, Y.; Tamagawa, M.; Kanamori, H.; Kato, M.; Ikenoue, S.; Kasuga, Y.; Kuroda, T.; Tanaka, M. Prepregnancy Assessment of Liver Function to Predict Perinatal and Postpregnancy Outcomes in Biliary Atresia Patients with Native Liver. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 3956. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10173956

AMA Style

Takahashi N, Ochiai D, Yamada Y, Tamagawa M, Kanamori H, Kato M, Ikenoue S, Kasuga Y, Kuroda T, Tanaka M. Prepregnancy Assessment of Liver Function to Predict Perinatal and Postpregnancy Outcomes in Biliary Atresia Patients with Native Liver. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2021; 10(17):3956. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10173956

Chicago/Turabian Style

Takahashi, Nobuhiro, Daigo Ochiai, Yohei Yamada, Masumi Tamagawa, Hiroki Kanamori, Mototoshi Kato, Satoru Ikenoue, Yoshifumi Kasuga, Tatsuo Kuroda, and Mamoru Tanaka. 2021. "Prepregnancy Assessment of Liver Function to Predict Perinatal and Postpregnancy Outcomes in Biliary Atresia Patients with Native Liver" Journal of Clinical Medicine 10, no. 17: 3956. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10173956

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