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Review

Outcomes of Universal Newborn Screening Programs: Systematic Review

1
Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Colorado Boulder, UCB 594, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
2
Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Lisa L. Hunter
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(13), 2784; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10132784
Received: 15 May 2021 / Revised: 8 June 2021 / Accepted: 10 June 2021 / Published: 24 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Newborn Hearing Loss: Detection and Intervention)
Background: This systematic review examined the outcomes (age of identification and intervention, developmental outcomes, cost-effectiveness, and adverse effects on parents) of universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) for children with permanent congenital hearing loss (PCHL). Materials and methods: Multiple electronic databases were interrogated in March and April 2020 with further reports identified from article citations and unpublished literature. UNHS reports in English with comparisons of outcomes of infants who were not screened, and infants identified through other hearing screening programs. Results: 30 eligible reports from 14 populations with 7,325,138 infants screened through UNHS from 1616 non-duplicate references were included. UNHS results in a lower age of identification, amplification, and the initiation of early intervention services and better language/literacy development. Better speech perception/production were shown in younger, but not in older, children with early identification after UNHS. No significant findings were found for behavior problems and quality of life. UNHS was found to be cost-effective in terms of savings to society. In addition, no significant parental harm was noted as a result of UNHS. Conclusions: In highly developed countries, significantly better outcomes were found for children identified early through UNHS programs. Early language development predicts later literacy and language development. View Full-Text
Keywords: childhood hearing loss; permanent childhood hearing loss; newborn hearing screening; universal hearing screening; early identification; early intervention; intervention outcomes childhood hearing loss; permanent childhood hearing loss; newborn hearing screening; universal hearing screening; early identification; early intervention; intervention outcomes
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yoshinaga-Itano, C.; Manchaiah, V.; Hunnicutt, C. Outcomes of Universal Newborn Screening Programs: Systematic Review. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 2784. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10132784

AMA Style

Yoshinaga-Itano C, Manchaiah V, Hunnicutt C. Outcomes of Universal Newborn Screening Programs: Systematic Review. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2021; 10(13):2784. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10132784

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine, Vinaya Manchaiah, and Cynthia Hunnicutt. 2021. "Outcomes of Universal Newborn Screening Programs: Systematic Review" Journal of Clinical Medicine 10, no. 13: 2784. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10132784

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