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Article

Relationship between Behavioral Infant Speech Perception and Hearing Age for Children with Hearing Loss

1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
2
Department of Biostatics and Informatics, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
3
Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
4
Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Lisa L. Hunter
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(19), 4566; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10194566
Received: 1 September 2021 / Revised: 25 September 2021 / Accepted: 28 September 2021 / Published: 30 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Newborn Hearing Loss: Detection and Intervention)
(1) Background: Research has demonstrated that early intervention for children who are hard-of-hearing (CHH) facilitates improved language development. Early speech perception abilities may impact CHH outcomes and guide future intervention. The objective of this study was to examine the use of a conditioned head turn (CHT) task as a measure of speech discrimination in CHH using a clinically feasible protocol. (2) Methods: Speech perception was assessed for a consonant and vowel contrast among 57 CHH and 70 children with normal hearing (CNH) aged 5–17 months using a CHT paradigm. (3) Results: Regardless of hearing status, 74% of CHH and 77% of CNH could discriminate /a-i/, and 55% of CHH and 56% of CNH could discriminate /ba-da/. Regression models revealed that both CHH and CNH performed better on /ba-da/ at 70 dBA compared to 50 dBA. Performance by hearing age showed no speech perception differences for CNH and children with mild hearing loss for either contrast. However, children with hearing losses ≥ 41 dB HL performed significantly poorer than CNH for /a-i/. (4) Conclusions: This study demonstrates the clinical feasibility of assessing early speech perception in infants with hearing loss and replicates previous findings of speech perception abilities among CHH and CNH. View Full-Text
Keywords: infant speech perception; early intervention; congenital hearing loss; hearing aids infant speech perception; early intervention; congenital hearing loss; hearing aids
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MDPI and ACS Style

Uhler, K.M.; Kaizer, A.M.; Walker, K.A.; Gilley, P.M. Relationship between Behavioral Infant Speech Perception and Hearing Age for Children with Hearing Loss. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 4566. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10194566

AMA Style

Uhler KM, Kaizer AM, Walker KA, Gilley PM. Relationship between Behavioral Infant Speech Perception and Hearing Age for Children with Hearing Loss. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2021; 10(19):4566. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10194566

Chicago/Turabian Style

Uhler, Kristin M., Alexander M. Kaizer, Kerry A. Walker, and Phillip M. Gilley. 2021. "Relationship between Behavioral Infant Speech Perception and Hearing Age for Children with Hearing Loss" Journal of Clinical Medicine 10, no. 19: 4566. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10194566

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