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Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: Insights into Its Pathobiology and Molecular Mechanisms
Article

Vertigo in Patients with Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy

1
Department of Neurology, University Hospital, 625 00 Brno, Czech Republic
2
Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, 625 00 Brno, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Allan R. Martin and Aria Nouri
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(11), 2496; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10112496
Received: 30 April 2021 / Revised: 30 May 2021 / Accepted: 3 June 2021 / Published: 4 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management of Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy and Spinal Cord Injury)
(1) Background: Cervical vertigo (CV) represents a controversial entity, with a prevalence ranging from reported high frequency to negation of CV existence. (2) Objectives: To assess the prevalence and cause of vertigo in patients with a manifest form of severe cervical spondylosis–degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM) with special focus on CV. (3) Methods: The study included 38 DCM patients. The presence and character of vertigo were explored with a dedicated questionnaire. The cervical torsion test was used to verify the role of neck proprioceptors, and ultrasound examinations of vertebral arteries to assess the role of arteriosclerotic stenotic changes as hypothetical mechanisms of CV. All patients with vertigo underwent a detailed diagnostic work-up to investigate the cause of vertigo. (4) Results: Symptoms of vertigo were described by 18 patients (47%). Causes of vertigo included: orthostatic dizziness in eight (22%), hypertension in five (14%), benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in four (11%) and psychogenic dizziness in one patient (3%). No patient responded positively to the cervical torsion test or showed significant stenosis of vertebral arteries. (5) Conclusions: Despite the high prevalence of vertigo in patients with DCM, the aetiology in all cases could be attributed to causes outside cervical spine and related nerve structures, thus confirming the assumption that CV is over-diagnosed. View Full-Text
Keywords: cervical vertigo; cervical dizziness; degenerative cervical myelopathy; degenerative cervical spinal cord compression; cervical torsion test cervical vertigo; cervical dizziness; degenerative cervical myelopathy; degenerative cervical spinal cord compression; cervical torsion test
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kadanka, Z., Jr.; Kadanka, Z., Sr.; Jura, R.; Bednarik, J. Vertigo in Patients with Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 2496. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10112496

AMA Style

Kadanka Z Jr., Kadanka Z Sr., Jura R, Bednarik J. Vertigo in Patients with Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2021; 10(11):2496. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10112496

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kadanka, Zdenek, Jr., Zdenek Kadanka Sr., Rene Jura, and Josef Bednarik. 2021. "Vertigo in Patients with Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy" Journal of Clinical Medicine 10, no. 11: 2496. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10112496

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