Next Article in Journal
Spain’s Hesitation at the Gates of a COVID-19 Vaccine
Previous Article in Journal
Vaccination Status of Mothers and Children from the ‘Mamma & Bambino’ Cohort
Previous Article in Special Issue
COVID-19 Vaccination: From Interesting Agent to the Patient
Open AccessArticle

Understanding the Influence of Individual and Systemic Factors on Vaccination Take-Up in European Citizens Aged 55 or Older

1
Institute for Virology, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen, Germany
2
RWI–Leibniz Institute for Economic Research, 45128 Essen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Pedro Plans-Rubió
Vaccines 2021, 9(2), 169; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9020169
Received: 25 January 2021 / Revised: 12 February 2021 / Accepted: 15 February 2021 / Published: 17 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Strategies to Increase Vaccination Coverage and Vaccine Confidence)
Background: High vaccination coverage provides extensive public health benefits. Hence, increasing vaccination rates is an important policy goal within the EU and worldwide. We aim to evaluate individual and systemic parameters associated with vaccination in European Union citizens aged 55 or older, using data from the Special Eurobarometer 488. Methods: Linear probability and probit models are estimated to analyze the determinants of vaccination take-up. Further, descriptive analyses are used to explore how the reasons for not having a vaccination differ by welfare regime. Results: High knowledge about the effectiveness and safety of vaccination increases the probability of receiving a vaccination during the past five years by 26 percentage points (pp), medium knowledge increases it by 15 pp. Focusing on the specific case of the flu, official recommendations increase this probability by, on average, 6 pp; while having to pay out-of-pocket for a recommended vaccination decreases it by, on average, 10 pp. Furthermore, the differences for no vaccination differ widely across welfare systems and television is the primary source for information about vaccination. Conclusions: Reported vaccination rates in Europe fall far below targets set by official recommendations. Increasing vaccination knowledge and offering vaccinations free of charge can help to increase vaccination rates. A specific focus should be put on reaching individuals with potential difficulties of access such as those living alone and unemployed. View Full-Text
Keywords: vaccination; vaccination hesitancy; vaccine knowledge vaccination; vaccination hesitancy; vaccine knowledge
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Anastasiou, O.E.; Heger, D. Understanding the Influence of Individual and Systemic Factors on Vaccination Take-Up in European Citizens Aged 55 or Older. Vaccines 2021, 9, 169. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9020169

AMA Style

Anastasiou OE, Heger D. Understanding the Influence of Individual and Systemic Factors on Vaccination Take-Up in European Citizens Aged 55 or Older. Vaccines. 2021; 9(2):169. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9020169

Chicago/Turabian Style

Anastasiou, Olympia E.; Heger, Dörte. 2021. "Understanding the Influence of Individual and Systemic Factors on Vaccination Take-Up in European Citizens Aged 55 or Older" Vaccines 9, no. 2: 169. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9020169

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop