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The African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV) Topoisomerase II as a Target for Viral Prevention and Control
Open AccessArticle

How to Demonstrate Freedom from African Swine Fever in Wild Boar—Estonia as an Example

1
Institute of Epidemiology, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Südufer 10, 17493 Greifswald, Insel Riems, Germany
2
Institute of Diagnostic Virology, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Südufer 10, 17493 Greifswald, Insel Riems, Germany
3
Estonian Veterinary and Food Laboratory (VFL), Kreutzwaldi 30, 51006 Tartu, Estonia
4
Estonian University of Life Science, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 62, 51014 Tartu, Estonia
5
Veterinary and Food Board, Väike-Paala 3, 11415 Tallinn, Estonia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Vaccines 2020, 8(2), 336; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8020336
Received: 8 June 2020 / Revised: 22 June 2020 / Accepted: 23 June 2020 / Published: 25 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue African Swine Fever Virus Prevention and Control)
Estonia has been combatting African swine fever (ASF) for six years now. Since October 2017, the disease has only been detected in the wild boar population, but trade restrictions had to remain in place due to international regulations. Yet, the epidemiological course of the disease has changed within the last few years. The prevalence of ASF virus (ASFV)-positive wild boar decreased steadily towards 0%. In February 2019, the last ASFV-positive wild boar was detected. Since then, positive wild boar samples have exclusively been positive for ASFV-specific antibodies, suggesting the possible absence of circulating ASFV in the Estonian wild boar population. However, as the role of seropositive animals is controversially discussed and the presence of antibody-carriers is regarded as an indication of virus circulation at EU and OIE level, Estonia remains under trade restrictions. To make the disease status of a country reliable for trading partners and to facilitate the process of declaration of disease freedom, we suggest to monitor the prevalence of seropositive wild boar in absence of ASFV-positive animals. The possibility to include ASF in the list of diseases, for which an official pathway for recognition of disease status is defined by the OIE should be evaluated. View Full-Text
Keywords: African swine fever; disease freedom; wild boar; serology; surveillance African swine fever; disease freedom; wild boar; serology; surveillance
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Schulz, K.; Staubach, C.; Blome, S.; Nurmoja, I.; Viltrop, A.; Conraths, F.J.; Kristian, M.; Sauter-Louis, C. How to Demonstrate Freedom from African Swine Fever in Wild Boar—Estonia as an Example. Vaccines 2020, 8, 336.

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