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Open AccessArticle

Features of the Human Antibody Response against the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Surface Glycoprotein G

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Division of Immunopathology, Department of Pathophysiology and Allergy Research, Center for Pathophysiology, Infectiology and Immunology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna, Austria
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Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
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Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, 14186 Stockholm, Sweden
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Centre of Allergy Research, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
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Division of Immunology and Allergy Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
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NRC Institute of Immunology FMBA of Russia, 115478 Moscow, Russia
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Laboratory for Immunopathology, Department of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow 119991, Russia
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Karl Landsteiner University of Health Sciences, 3500 Krems, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Vaccines 2020, 8(2), 337; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8020337
Received: 22 May 2020 / Revised: 14 June 2020 / Accepted: 18 June 2020 / Published: 25 June 2020
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections are a major cause of serious respiratory disease in infants. RSV occurs as two major subgroups A and B, which mainly differ regarding the surface glycoprotein G. The G protein is important for virus attachment and G-specific antibodies can protect against infection. We expressed the surface-exposed part of A2 strain-derived G (A2-G) in baculovirus-infected insect cells and synthesized overlapping peptides spanning complete A2-G. The investigation of the natural IgG response of adult subjects during a period of one year showed that IgG antibodies (i) recognize G significantly stronger than the fusion protein F0, (ii) target mainly non-conformational, sequential peptide epitopes from the exposed conserved region but also buried peptides, and (iii) exhibit a scattered but constant recognition profile during the observation period. The IgG subclass reactivity profile (IgG1 > IgG2 > IgG4 = IgG3) was indicative of a mixed Th1/Th2 response. Two strongly RSV-neutralizing sera including the 1st WHO standard contained high IgG anti-G levels. G-specific IgG increased strongly in children after wheezing attacks suggesting RSV as trigger factor. Our study shows that RSV G and G-derived peptides are useful for serological diagnosis of RSV-triggered exacerbations of respiratory diseases and underlines the importance of G for development of RSV-neutralizing vaccines. View Full-Text
Keywords: respiratory syncytial virus (RSV); glycoprotein protein; recombinant proteins; G protein; epitope; antibody response respiratory syncytial virus (RSV); glycoprotein protein; recombinant proteins; G protein; epitope; antibody response
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Borochova, K.; Niespodziana, K.; Stenberg Hammar, K.; van Hage, M.; Hedlin, G.; Söderhäll, C.; Focke-Tejkl, M.; Valenta, R. Features of the Human Antibody Response against the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Surface Glycoprotein G. Vaccines 2020, 8, 337.

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