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Brief Report

Systemic Cancer Therapy Does Not Significantly Impact Early Vaccine-Elicited SARS-CoV-2 Immunity in Patients with Solid Tumors

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA
2
Institute for Global Health and Translational Sciences, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA
3
Department of Hematology and Oncology, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA
4
Department of Medical Oncology, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Federico De Marco
Vaccines 2022, 10(5), 738; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10050738
Received: 10 April 2022 / Revised: 4 May 2022 / Accepted: 6 May 2022 / Published: 9 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Immune Responses to COVID-19 Vaccines)
mRNA vaccines have been shown to be safe and effective in individuals with cancer. It is unclear, however, if systemic anti-cancer therapy impacts the coordinated cellular and humoral immune responses elicited by SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccines. To fill this knowledge gap, we assessed SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine-elicited immunity in a cohort of patients with advanced solid tumors either under observation or receiving systemic anti-cancer therapy. This analysis revealed that SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine-elicited cellular and humoral immunity was not significantly different in individuals with cancer receiving systemic anti-cancer therapy relative to individuals under observation. Furthermore, even though some patients exhibited suboptimal antibody titers after vaccination, SARS-CoV-2 specific cellular immune responses were still detected. These data suggest that antibody titers offer an incomplete picture of vaccine-elicited SARS-CoV-2 immunity in cancer patients undergoing active systemic anti-cancer therapy, and that vaccine-elicited cellular immunity exists even in the absence of significant quantities of SARS-CoV-2 specific antibodies. View Full-Text
Keywords: cancer therapy; COVID-19; vaccine-elicited immunity; antibody titer; T cell response cancer therapy; COVID-19; vaccine-elicited immunity; antibody titer; T cell response
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MDPI and ACS Style

Waickman, A.T.; Lu, J.; Chase, C.; Fang, H.; McDowell, E.; Bingham, E.; Bogart, J.; Graziano, S.; Thomas, S.J.; Gentile, T. Systemic Cancer Therapy Does Not Significantly Impact Early Vaccine-Elicited SARS-CoV-2 Immunity in Patients with Solid Tumors. Vaccines 2022, 10, 738. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10050738

AMA Style

Waickman AT, Lu J, Chase C, Fang H, McDowell E, Bingham E, Bogart J, Graziano S, Thomas SJ, Gentile T. Systemic Cancer Therapy Does Not Significantly Impact Early Vaccine-Elicited SARS-CoV-2 Immunity in Patients with Solid Tumors. Vaccines. 2022; 10(5):738. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10050738

Chicago/Turabian Style

Waickman, Adam T., Joseph Lu, Corey Chase, Hengsheng Fang, Erinn McDowell, Erin Bingham, Jeffrey Bogart, Stephen Graziano, Stephen J. Thomas, and Teresa Gentile. 2022. "Systemic Cancer Therapy Does Not Significantly Impact Early Vaccine-Elicited SARS-CoV-2 Immunity in Patients with Solid Tumors" Vaccines 10, no. 5: 738. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10050738

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