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Article

Effect of Cooking Methods on the Antioxidant Capacity of Plant Foods Submitted to In Vitro Digestion–Fermentation

1
Centro de Investigación Biomédica, Departamento de Nutrición y Bromatología, Instituto de Nutrición y Tecnología de Alimentos, Universidad de Granada, 52005 Granada, Spain
2
Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria (ibs.GRANADA), Universidad de Granada, 52005 Granada, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors share the same authorship.
Antioxidants 2020, 9(12), 1312; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9121312
Received: 24 November 2020 / Revised: 18 December 2020 / Accepted: 19 December 2020 / Published: 21 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Processing on Antioxidant Rich Foods)
The antioxidant capacity of foods is essential to complement the body’s own endogenous antioxidant systems. The main antioxidant foods in the regular diet are those of plant origin. Although every kind of food has a different antioxidant capacity, thermal processing or cooking methods also play a role. In this work, the antioxidant capacity of 42 foods of vegetable origin was evaluated after in vitro digestion and fermentation. All foods were studied both raw and after different thermal processing methods, such as boiling, grilling roasting, frying, toasting and brewing. The cooking methods had an impact on the antioxidant capacity of the digested and fermented fractions, allowing the release and transformation of antioxidant compounds. In general, the fermented fraction accounted for up to 80–98% of the total antioxidant capacity. The most antioxidant foods were cocoa and legumes, which contributed to 20% of the daily antioxidant capacity intake. Finally, it was found that the antioxidant capacity of the studied foods was much higher than those reported by other authors since digestion–fermentation pretreatment allows for a higher extraction of antioxidant compounds and their transformation by the gut microbiota. View Full-Text
Keywords: antioxidant capacity; in vitro digestion–fermentation; thermal processing; cooking methods; plant foods antioxidant capacity; in vitro digestion–fermentation; thermal processing; cooking methods; plant foods
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MDPI and ACS Style

Navajas-Porras, B.; Pérez-Burillo, S.; Valverde-Moya, Á.J.; Hinojosa-Nogueira, D.; Pastoriza, S.; Rufián-Henares, J.Á. Effect of Cooking Methods on the Antioxidant Capacity of Plant Foods Submitted to In Vitro Digestion–Fermentation. Antioxidants 2020, 9, 1312. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9121312

AMA Style

Navajas-Porras B, Pérez-Burillo S, Valverde-Moya ÁJ, Hinojosa-Nogueira D, Pastoriza S, Rufián-Henares JÁ. Effect of Cooking Methods on the Antioxidant Capacity of Plant Foods Submitted to In Vitro Digestion–Fermentation. Antioxidants. 2020; 9(12):1312. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9121312

Chicago/Turabian Style

Navajas-Porras, Beatriz, Sergio Pérez-Burillo, Álvaro J. Valverde-Moya, Daniel Hinojosa-Nogueira, Silvia Pastoriza, and José Á. Rufián-Henares. 2020. "Effect of Cooking Methods on the Antioxidant Capacity of Plant Foods Submitted to In Vitro Digestion–Fermentation" Antioxidants 9, no. 12: 1312. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9121312

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