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Brain White Matter: A Substrate for Resilience and a Substance for Subcortical Small Vessel Disease
Perspective

MTHFR Gene Mutations Correlate with White Matter Disease Burden and Predict Cerebrovascular Disease and Dementia

1
Vascular Neurology, Houston Methodist Hospital Neurological Institute, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2
Alzheimer Clinic, Houston Methodist Hospital Neurological Institute, Houston, TX 77030, USA
3
Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Neurology, Cornell University, New York, NY 10065, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(9), 211; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9090211
Received: 25 July 2019 / Revised: 10 August 2019 / Accepted: 19 August 2019 / Published: 22 August 2019
The incidence of dementia is on the rise and expected to continue to increase in the foreseeable future. Two of the most common subtypes of dementia are Alzheimer’s subtype and vascular dementia. Hyperhomocysteinemia has been shown to serve as a risk factor for dementia due to an associated blood–brain barrier dysfunction and subsequent small-vessel disease pathology. There are varying causes for hyperhomocysteinemia, including genetic and dietary, among others. We highlight the importance of identifying hyperhomocysteinemia as a potential etiologic and therapeutic target for the most common subtypes of dementia. View Full-Text
Keywords: MTHFR gene; dementia; homocysteine; Alzheimer’s disease MTHFR gene; dementia; homocysteine; Alzheimer’s disease
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cajavilca, C.E.; Gadhia, R.R.; Román, G.C. MTHFR Gene Mutations Correlate with White Matter Disease Burden and Predict Cerebrovascular Disease and Dementia. Brain Sci. 2019, 9, 211. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9090211

AMA Style

Cajavilca CE, Gadhia RR, Román GC. MTHFR Gene Mutations Correlate with White Matter Disease Burden and Predict Cerebrovascular Disease and Dementia. Brain Sciences. 2019; 9(9):211. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9090211

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cajavilca, Christian E., Rajan R. Gadhia, and Gustavo C. Román 2019. "MTHFR Gene Mutations Correlate with White Matter Disease Burden and Predict Cerebrovascular Disease and Dementia" Brain Sciences 9, no. 9: 211. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9090211

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