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Open AccessArticle

Driving After Drinking Alcohol Associated with Insufficient Sleep and Insomnia among Student Athletes and Non-Athletes

1
School of Psychology, Laval University, Quebec, QC G1V0A6, Canada
2
Northumbria Sleep Research Laboratory, Northumbria University, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne NE1 8ST, UK
3
Department of Athletics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
4
Departments of R & D Psychiatry, Corporal Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
5
Department of Population Health, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA
6
Department of Health Science, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35401, USA
7
Psychiatry, Psychology, and Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ 85713, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(2), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9020046
Received: 29 January 2019 / Revised: 15 February 2019 / Accepted: 18 February 2019 / Published: 20 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insomnia: Beyond Hyperarousal)
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PDF [237 KB, uploaded 20 February 2019]
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Abstract

Introduction: The proportion of university/college students (UCS) consuming alcohol is similar to the number of those reporting poor sleep, at approximately 30%, the proportion being greater in student athletes (SA). What remains to be understood is if poor sleep potentiates risky behaviors. Objective: Our aim was to examine the association among sleep difficulties, insomnia symptoms, and insufficient sleep on the risk of driving under the influence of alcohol in a sample of UCS and whether these associations were more pertinent in SA. Methods: Data from the National University/College Health Assessment was used from the years 2011–2014. Questions on number of drinks consumed and behaviors such as driving after drinking alcohol were related to answers to questions pertaining to sleep difficulties, insufficient sleep, and insomnia symptoms. Results: Mean alcohol intake was of about 3 drinks; SA consumed significantly more than student non-athletes (SNA). Binge-drinking episodes were significantly higher among SA than SNA. Difficulty sleeping was associated with an increased likelihood of driving after any drinks and after 5 or more drinks in both groups, effects being stronger among SA. Insomnia was associated with an increased likelihood of driving after any drinks and after 5 or more drinks in SA and after 5 or more drinks in SNA. These effects were stronger among athletes. Conclusion: The present study found that self-reported difficulties sleeping, insomnia symptoms, and insufficient sleep are associated with driving after drinking alcohol. This relationship applied to driving after drinking any alcohol or binge drinking and was again stronger among SA than SNA. View Full-Text
Keywords: students; athletes; driving after drinking alcohol; insufficient sleep; insomnia students; athletes; driving after drinking alcohol; insufficient sleep; insomnia
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bastien, C.H.; Ellis, J.G.; Athey, A.; Chakravorty, S.; Robbins, R.; Knowlden, A.P.; Charest, J.; Grandner, M.A. Driving After Drinking Alcohol Associated with Insufficient Sleep and Insomnia among Student Athletes and Non-Athletes. Brain Sci. 2019, 9, 46.

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