Next Article in Journal
Neuroendocrine and Inflammatory Effects of Childhood Trauma Following Psychosocial and Inflammatory Stress in Women with Remitted Major Depressive Disorder
Previous Article in Journal
Cortical Thickness Links Impulsive Personality Traits and Risky Behavior
Previous Article in Special Issue
Effects of Prism Adaptation on Reference Systems for Extrapersonal Space in Neglect Patients
Open AccessArticle

Spatial Neglect in Stroke: Identification, Disease Process and Association with Outcome During Inpatient Rehabilitation

by Ulrike Hammerbeck 1, Matthew Gittins 2, Andy Vail 2, Lizz Paley 3, Sarah F Tyson 4 and Audrey Bowen 1,* on behalf of the SSNAPIEST Team
1
Division of Neuroscience and Experimental Psychology, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, MAHSC, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
2
Centre for Biostatistics, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, MAHSC, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
3
School of Population Health and Environmental Sciences, Kings College London, London SE1 1UL, UK
4
Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester, MAHSC, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(12), 374; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9120374
Received: 30 October 2019 / Revised: 21 November 2019 / Accepted: 11 December 2019 / Published: 13 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Unilateral Neglect Assessment and Rehabilitation)
We established spatial neglect prevalence, disease profile and amount of therapy that inpatient stroke survivors received, and outcomes at discharge using Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme (SSNAP) data. We used data from 88,664 National Health Service (NHS) admissions in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (July 2013–July 2015), for stroke survivors still in hospital after 3 days with a completed baseline neglect National Institute for Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. Thirty percent had neglect (NIHSS item 11 ≥ 1) and they were slightly older (78 years) than those without neglect (75 years). Neglect was observed more commonly in women (33 vs. 27%) and in individuals with a premorbid dependency (37 vs. 28%). Survivors of mild stroke were far less likely to present with neglect than those with severe stroke (4% vs. 84%). Those with neglect had a greatly increased length of stay (27 vs. 10 days). They received a comparable amount of average daily occupational and physiotherapy during their longer inpatient stay but on discharge a greater percentage of individuals with neglect were dependent on the modified Rankin scale (76 vs. 57%). Spatial neglect is common and associated with worse clinical outcomes. These results add to our understanding of neglect to inform clinical guidelines, service provision and priorities for future research. View Full-Text
Keywords: spatial neglect; stroke; severity; length of stay; dependency; outcomes; therapy; rehabilitation spatial neglect; stroke; severity; length of stay; dependency; outcomes; therapy; rehabilitation
MDPI and ACS Style

Hammerbeck, U.; Gittins, M.; Vail, A.; Paley, L.; Tyson, S.F.; Bowen, A., on behalf of the SSNAPIEST Team; Spatial Neglect in Stroke: Identification, Disease Process and Association with Outcome During Inpatient Rehabilitation. Brain Sci. 2019, 9, 374.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop