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Article

You See What You Smell: Preferential Processing of Chemosensory Satiety Cues and Its Impact on Body Shape Perception

1
Department of Experimental Psychology, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, D-40225 Düsseldorf, Germany
2
FOM University of Applied Sciences, D-45141 Essen, Germany
3
Institute of Psychology, Experimental Psychology II and Biological Psychology, University of Osnabrück, D-49074 Osnabrück, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Rachel S. Herz
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(9), 1152; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11091152
Received: 13 July 2021 / Revised: 25 August 2021 / Accepted: 26 August 2021 / Published: 30 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Human Olfactory Perception)
The current study examines neural responses to satiety- and fasting-related volatiles and their effect on the processing of body shapes. Axillary sweat was sampled with cotton pads from 10 individuals after 12 h of fasting, and after having consumed a standard breakfast. Pure cotton pads served as the control. The chemosensory stimuli were presented to 20 participants (via a constant-flow olfactometer) exclusively, and additionally as context to images of overweight and underweight avatars. EEG was recorded (61 electrodes), and chemosensory (CSERPs; P1, N1, P2, P3) and visual event-related potentials (VERPs; N1, P2, P3a, P3b) were analyzed. The amplitudes of all positive CSERP components differed more strongly from cotton in response to chemosensory satiety cues as compared to fasting cues (P1: p = 0.023, P2: p = 0.083, P3: p = 0.031), paralleled by activity within the middle frontal and temporal gyrus. Overweight compared to underweight body shapes tended to elicit larger VERP P2 amplitudes (p = 0.068), and chemosensory satiety cues amplified the VERP amplitudes in response to any body shape (P2, P3a, P3b; all ps ≤ 0.017) as compared to the cotton control. The results indicate that chemosensory satiety cues transmit complex social information, overriding the processing of analogous visual input. View Full-Text
Keywords: satiety; fasting; diet; metabolic state; BMI; body odors; chemosensory communication; olfaction; chemosensory cues; event-related potentials satiety; fasting; diet; metabolic state; BMI; body odors; chemosensory communication; olfaction; chemosensory cues; event-related potentials
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pause, B.M.; Schäfer, A.S.; Hoenen, M.; Lübke, K.T.; Stockhorst, U. You See What You Smell: Preferential Processing of Chemosensory Satiety Cues and Its Impact on Body Shape Perception. Brain Sci. 2021, 11, 1152. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11091152

AMA Style

Pause BM, Schäfer AS, Hoenen M, Lübke KT, Stockhorst U. You See What You Smell: Preferential Processing of Chemosensory Satiety Cues and Its Impact on Body Shape Perception. Brain Sciences. 2021; 11(9):1152. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11091152

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pause, Bettina M., Annika S. Schäfer, Matthias Hoenen, Katrin T. Lübke, and Ursula Stockhorst. 2021. "You See What You Smell: Preferential Processing of Chemosensory Satiety Cues and Its Impact on Body Shape Perception" Brain Sciences 11, no. 9: 1152. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11091152

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