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Article

Cognitive Exercise Self-Efficacy of Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Measurement and Associations with Other Self-Reported Cognitive Exercise Factors

1
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, 300 1st Avenue, Charleston, MA 02129, USA
Academic Editor: Roumen Kirov
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(6), 672; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11060672
Received: 19 March 2021 / Revised: 12 May 2021 / Accepted: 19 May 2021 / Published: 21 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise and Brain Function—Series II)
Exercise self-efficacy, the confidence a person has in their ability to develop and meet exercise goals, is key to exercise motivation. The primary objective of this pilot study was to explore associations among cognitive exercise self-efficacy, cognitive exercise frequency, challenge, and enjoyment in older adults. A prospective, cross-sectional, observational study design was used with 133 community-dwelling individuals aged 55 years and older. Respondents completed a cognitive exercise self-efficacy scale and responded to cognitive exercise queries. Individuals who engaged in cognitive exercise demonstrated greater cognitive exercise self-efficacy. Cognitive exercise self-efficacy ratings were significantly different across challenge and enjoyment conditions (Pearson’s χ2 test, df = 9, N = 133, χ2 = 123.49, p < 0.01), such that the greater the perception of each, the greater the cognitive exercise self-efficacy (p < 0.01). The comparative impact of perceived enjoyment on cognitive exercise self-efficacy was greater than the impact of perceived challenge. Study findings support positive associations among cognitive exercise self-efficacy, cognitive exercise frequency, challenge, and enjoyment. Consideration of these findings may inform design and sustained implementation of motivating cognitive exercise programs to maximize health and quality of life outcomes of healthy and neurologic older adult populations. View Full-Text
Keywords: challenge; enjoyment; motivation; self-efficacy; cognition; exercise challenge; enjoyment; motivation; self-efficacy; cognition; exercise
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MDPI and ACS Style

O’Neil-Pirozzi, T.M. Cognitive Exercise Self-Efficacy of Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Measurement and Associations with Other Self-Reported Cognitive Exercise Factors. Brain Sci. 2021, 11, 672. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11060672

AMA Style

O’Neil-Pirozzi TM. Cognitive Exercise Self-Efficacy of Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Measurement and Associations with Other Self-Reported Cognitive Exercise Factors. Brain Sciences. 2021; 11(6):672. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11060672

Chicago/Turabian Style

O’Neil-Pirozzi, Therese M. 2021. "Cognitive Exercise Self-Efficacy of Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Measurement and Associations with Other Self-Reported Cognitive Exercise Factors" Brain Sciences 11, no. 6: 672. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11060672

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