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Article

Intentional Binding Effects in the Experience of Noticing the Regularity of a Perceptual-Motor Task

1
Department of Neurorehabilitation, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kio University, 4-2-2 Umaminaka, Koryo, Kitakatsuragi-gun, Nara 635-0832, Japan
2
Department of Rehabilitation, Fujiikai Rehabilitation Hospital, 17-6 Yayoi-cho, Higashiosaka-city, Osaka 579-8026, Japan
3
Department of Rehabilitation, Higashiosaka Yamaji Hospital, 1-7-5 Inaba, Higashiosaka-city, Osaka 578-0925, Japan
4
Neurorehabilitation Research Center, Kio University, 4-2-2 Umaminaka, Koryo, Kitakatsuragi-gun, Nara 635-0832, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2020, 10(9), 659; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10090659
Received: 15 August 2020 / Revised: 16 September 2020 / Accepted: 18 September 2020 / Published: 22 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Body in Brain Plasticity)
Noticing the regularity of the task is necessary to enhance motor performance. The experience of noticing further motivates improvement in motor performance. Motor control is explained by a comparator model that modifies the motor command to reduce discrepancies between sensory predictions and actual outcomes. A similar model could apply to sense of agency (SoA). SoA refers to the sensation of controlling one’s own actions and, through them, the outcomes in the external world. SoA may also be enhanced by the experience of noticing errors. We recently reported gradual enhancement of SoA in participants with high perceptual-motor performance. However, what component of the motor task changed the SoA is unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the influence over time of the experience of noticing during a motor task on SoA. Participants performed an implicit regularity perceptual-motor task and an intentional binding task (a method that can quantitatively measure SoA) simultaneously. We separated participants into groups after the experiment based on noticing or not noticing the regularity. SoA was gradually enhanced in the noticing group, compared with that of the non-noticing group. The results suggest that the experience of noticing may enhance SoA during perceptual-motor tasks. View Full-Text
Keywords: intentional binding; experience of noticing; motor performance intentional binding; experience of noticing; motor performance
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hayashida, K.; Nishi, Y.; Masuike, A.; Morioka, S. Intentional Binding Effects in the Experience of Noticing the Regularity of a Perceptual-Motor Task. Brain Sci. 2020, 10, 659. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10090659

AMA Style

Hayashida K, Nishi Y, Masuike A, Morioka S. Intentional Binding Effects in the Experience of Noticing the Regularity of a Perceptual-Motor Task. Brain Sciences. 2020; 10(9):659. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10090659

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hayashida, Kazuki; Nishi, Yuki; Masuike, Akihiro; Morioka, Shu. 2020. "Intentional Binding Effects in the Experience of Noticing the Regularity of a Perceptual-Motor Task" Brain Sci. 10, no. 9: 659. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10090659

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