Next Article in Journal
Application of Chaos Theory in the Assessment of Emotional Vulnerability and Emotion Dysregulation in Adults
Previous Article in Journal
Synergistic Effects of Scalp Acupuncture and Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Cerebral Infarction: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial
Open AccessArticle

Exercise Training Results in Lower Amyloid Plaque Load and Greater Cognitive Function in an Intensity Dependent Manner in the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

1
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO 65897, USA
2
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
3
Hope Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
4
Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
5
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2020, 10(2), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10020088
Received: 31 December 2019 / Revised: 27 January 2020 / Accepted: 6 February 2020 / Published: 8 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuropathology of Alzheimer’s Disease)
Three months of exercise training (ET) decreases soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels in an intensity dependent manner early in life in Tg2576 mice (Moore et al., 2016). Here, we examined the effects of 12 months of low- and high- intensity exercise training on cognitive function and amyloid plaque load in the cortex and hippocampus of 15-month-old Tg2576 mice. Low- (LOW) and high- (HI) intensity ET animals ran at speeds of 15 m/min on a level treadmill and 32 m/min at a 10% grade, respectively, for 60 min/day, five days/week, from 3 to 15 months of age. Sedentary mice (SED) were placed on a level, non-moving, treadmill for the same duration. ET mice demonstrated a significantly lower amyloid plaque load in the cortex and hippocampus that was intensity dependent. Improvement in cognitive function, assessed by Morris Water Maze and Novel Object Recognition tests, was greater in the HI group compared to the LOW and SED groups. LOW mice performed better in the initial latency to the platform location during the probe trial of the Morris Water Maze (MWM) test than SED, but not in any other aspect of MWM or the Novel Object Recognition test. The results of this study indicate that exercise training decreases amyloid plaque load in an intensity dependent manner and that high-intensity exercise training improves cognitive function relative to SED mice, but the intensity of the LOW group was below the threshold to demonstrate robust improvement in cognitive function in Tg2576 mice. View Full-Text
Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease; exercise training; amyloid plaque; cognitive function; Tg2576 mice Alzheimer’s disease; exercise training; amyloid plaque; cognitive function; Tg2576 mice
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Thomas, R.; Zimmerman, S.D.; Yuede, K.M.; Cirrito, J.R.; Tai, L.M.; Timson, B.F.; Yuede, C.M. Exercise Training Results in Lower Amyloid Plaque Load and Greater Cognitive Function in an Intensity Dependent Manner in the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease. Brain Sci. 2020, 10, 88.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop