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Open AccessArticle

Should the Minimal Intervention Principle Be Considered When Investigating Dual-Tasking Effects on Postural Control?

1
Department of Sport Science, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck 6020, Austria
2
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Phayao, Phayao 56000, Thailand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2020, 10(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10010001
Received: 6 November 2019 / Revised: 30 November 2019 / Accepted: 18 December 2019 / Published: 19 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Collection on Systems Neuroscience)
Dual-tasking charges the sensorimotor system with performing two tasks simultaneously. Center of pressure (COP) analysis reveals the postural control that is altered during dual-tasking, but may not reveal the underlying neural mechanisms. In the current study, we hypothesized that the minimal intervention principle (MIP) provides a concept by which dual-tasking effects on the organization and prioritization of postural control can be predicted. Postural movements of 23 adolescents (age 12.7 ± 1.3; 8 females) and 15 adults (26.9 ± 2.3) were measured in a bipedal stance with eyes open, eyes closed and eyes open while performing a dual-task using a force plate and 39 reflective markers. COP data was analyzed by calculating the mean velocity, standard deviation and amplitude of displacement. Kinematic data was examined by performing a principal component analysis (PCA) and extracting postural movement components. Two variables were determined to investigate changes in amplitude (aVark) and in control (Nk) of the principal movement components. Results in aVark and in Nk agreed well with the predicted dual-tasking effects. Thus, the current study corroborates the notion that the MIP should be considered when investigating postural control under dual-tasking conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: motor control; automatization; optimal feedback control; minimal intervention principle; principal component analysis; postural control; adolescents and adults; attentional focus motor control; automatization; optimal feedback control; minimal intervention principle; principal component analysis; postural control; adolescents and adults; attentional focus
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Wachholz, F.; Tiribello, F.; Promsri, A.; Federolf, P. Should the Minimal Intervention Principle Be Considered When Investigating Dual-Tasking Effects on Postural Control? Brain Sci. 2020, 10, 1.

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