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Open AccessArticle

Use of 3D Printing in Model Manufacturing for Minor Surgery Training of General Practitioners in Primary Care

1
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Cordoba, Medina Azahara Avenue, Cordoba 14071, Spain. [email protected] (M.C.L.)
2
Primary Care Center of La Carlota, La Paz Avenue, La Carlota, Cordoba 14100, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(23), 5212; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9235212
Received: 1 November 2019 / Revised: 28 November 2019 / Accepted: 28 November 2019 / Published: 30 November 2019
In order to increase the efficiency of the Spanish health system, minor surgery programs are currently carried out in primary care centers. This organizational change has led to the need to train many general practitioners (GPs) in this discipline on a practical level. Due to the cost of the existing minor surgery training models in the market, pig’s feet or chicken thighs are used to practice the removal of figured lesions and the suture of wounds. In the present work, the use of 3D printing is proposed, to manufacture models that reproduce in a realistic way the most common lesions in minor surgery practice, and that allow doctors to be trained in an adequate way. Four models with the most common dermal lesions have been designed and manufactured, and then evaluated by a panel of experts. Face validity was demonstrated with four items on a five-point Likert scale that was completed anonymously. The models have obtained the following results: aesthetic recreation, 4.6 ± 0.5; realism during anesthesia infiltration, 4.8 ± 0.4; realism during lesion removal, 2.8 ± 0.4; realism during surgical wound closure, 1.2 ± 0.4. The score in this last section could be improved if a more elastic skin-colored filament were found on the market. View Full-Text
Keywords: 3D printing; additive manufacturing; fused deposition modeling (FDM); minor surgery; primary care; surgical training 3D printing; additive manufacturing; fused deposition modeling (FDM); minor surgery; primary care; surgical training
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MDPI and ACS Style

Luque, M.; Calleja-Hortelano, A.; Romero, P. Use of 3D Printing in Model Manufacturing for Minor Surgery Training of General Practitioners in Primary Care. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 5212.

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