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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Essential Oil Compositions and Antifungal Activity of Sunflower (Helianthus) Species Growing in North Alabama

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Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899, USA
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Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899, USA
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Aromatic Plant Research Center, 230 N 1200 E, Suite 100, Lehi, UT 84043, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(15), 3179; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9153179
Received: 1 May 2019 / Revised: 31 July 2019 / Accepted: 2 August 2019 / Published: 5 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Activity and Applications of Natural Compounds)
Helianthus species are North American members of the Asteraceae, several of which have been used as traditional medicines by Native Americans. The aerial parts of two cultivars of Helianthus annuus, “Chianti” and “Mammoth”, and wild-growing H. strumosus, were collected from locations in north Alabama. The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography—mass spectrometry. The Helianthus essential oils were dominated by monoterpene hydrocarbons, in particular α-pinene (50.65%, 48.91%, and 58.65%, respectively), sabinene (6.81%, 17.01%, and 1.91%, respectively), β-pinene (5.79%, 3.27%, and 4.52%, respectively), and limonene (7.2%, 7.1%, and 3.8%, respectively). The essential oils were screened against three opportunistic pathogenic fungal species, Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans, and Cryptococcus neoformans. The most sensitive fungus was C. neoformans with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 78, 156, and 78 μg/mL, respectively. View Full-Text
Keywords: Helianthus annuus; Helianthus strumosus; Aspergillus niger; Candida albicans; Cryptococcus neoformans; α-pinene Helianthus annuus; Helianthus strumosus; Aspergillus niger; Candida albicans; Cryptococcus neoformans; α-pinene
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lawson, S.K.; Sharp, L.G.; Powers, C.N.; McFeeters, R.L.; Satyal, P.; Setzer, W.N. Essential Oil Compositions and Antifungal Activity of Sunflower (Helianthus) Species Growing in North Alabama. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 3179.

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