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Article

Entanglement, and Unsorted Database Search in Noise-Based Logic

1
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A & M University, 3128 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3128, USA
2
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Texas A & M University, 3112 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3112, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(15), 3029; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9153029
Received: 30 April 2019 / Revised: 15 July 2019 / Accepted: 25 July 2019 / Published: 27 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue (Quantum) Physical Informatics)
We explore the collapse of “wavefunction” and the measurement of entanglement in the superpositions of hyperspace vectors in classical physical instantaneous-noise-based logic (INBL). We find both similarities with and major differences from the related properties of quantum systems. Two search algorithms utilizing the observed features are introduced. For the first one we assume an unsorted names database set up by Alice that is a superposition (unknown by Bob) of up to n = 2N strings; those we call names. Bob has access to the superposition wave and to the 2N reference noises of the INBL system of N noise bits. For Bob, to decide if a given name x is included in the superposition, once the search has begun, it takes N switching operations followed by a single measurement of the superposition wave. Thus, the time and hardware complexity of the search algorithm is O[log(n)], which indicates an exponential speedup compared to Grover’s quantum algorithm in a corresponding setting. An extra advantage is that the error probability of the search is zero. Moreover, the scheme can also check the existence of a fraction of a string, or several separate string fractions embedded in an arbitrarily long, arbitrary string. In the second algorithm, we expand the above scheme to a phonebook with n names and s phone numbers. When the names and numbers have the same bit resolution, once the search has begun, the time and hardware complexity of this search algorithm is O[log(n)]. In the case of one-to-one correspondence between names and phone numbers (n = s), the algorithm offers inverse phonebook search too. The error probability of this search algorithm is also zero. View Full-Text
Keywords: search in unsorted unknown databases; instantaneous noise-based logic; classical entanglement; special-purpose computing; stochastic processes; classical statistical physics; exponential speedup search in unsorted unknown databases; instantaneous noise-based logic; classical entanglement; special-purpose computing; stochastic processes; classical statistical physics; exponential speedup
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kish, L.B.; Daugherity, W.C. Entanglement, and Unsorted Database Search in Noise-Based Logic. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 3029. https://doi.org/10.3390/app9153029

AMA Style

Kish LB, Daugherity WC. Entanglement, and Unsorted Database Search in Noise-Based Logic. Applied Sciences. 2019; 9(15):3029. https://doi.org/10.3390/app9153029

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kish, Laszlo B., and Walter C. Daugherity. 2019. "Entanglement, and Unsorted Database Search in Noise-Based Logic" Applied Sciences 9, no. 15: 3029. https://doi.org/10.3390/app9153029

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