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Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(2), 189; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8020189

Monitoring Damage Using Acoustic Emission Source Location and Computational Geometry in Reinforced Concrete Beams

1
De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Avenue, Manila 1004, Philippines
2
Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro Ookayama 2-12-1, Tokyo 152-8552, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 November 2017 / Revised: 20 January 2018 / Accepted: 23 January 2018 / Published: 26 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soft Computing Techniques in Structural Engineering and Materials)
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Abstract

Non-destructive testing in reinforced concrete (RC) for damage detection is still limited to date. In monitoring the damage in RC, 18 beam specimens with varying water cement ratios and reinforcements were casted and tested using a four-point bending test. Repeated step loads were designed and at each step load acoustic emission (AE) signals were recorded and processed to obtain the acoustic emission source location (AESL). Computational geometry using a convex hull algorithm was used to determine the maximum volume formed by the AESL inside the concrete beam in relation to the load applied. The convex hull volume (CHV) showed good relation to the damage encountered until 60% of the ultimate load at the midspan was reached, where compression in the concrete occurred. The changes in CHV from 20 to 40% and 20 to 60% load were five and 13 times from CHV of 20% load for all beams, respectively. This indicated that the analysis in three dimensions using CHV was sensitive to damage. In addition, a high water-cement ratio exhibited higher CHV formation compared to a lower water-cement ratio due to its ductility where the movement of AESL becomes wider. View Full-Text
Keywords: non-destructive test; concrete; acoustic emission; computational geometry; convex hull non-destructive test; concrete; acoustic emission; computational geometry; convex hull
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Ongpeng, J.M.C.; Oreta, A.W.C.; Hirose, S. Monitoring Damage Using Acoustic Emission Source Location and Computational Geometry in Reinforced Concrete Beams. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 189.

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