Next Article in Journal
MPCR-Net: Multiple Partial Point Clouds Registration Network Using a Global Template
Next Article in Special Issue
Diffusional Behavior of New Insulating Gas Mixtures as Alternatives to the SF6-Use in Medium Voltage Switchgear
Previous Article in Journal
Alleviation of Osteoarthritis-Induced Pain and Motor Deficits in Rats by a Novel Device for the Intramuscular Insertion of Cog Polydioxanone Filament
Previous Article in Special Issue
Camera-Based In-Process Quality Measurement of Hairpin Welding
 
 
Article

Optical In-Process Measurement: Concepts for Precise, Fast and Robust Optical Metrology for Complex Measurement Situations

1
Bremer Institut für Angewandte Strahltechnik GmbH (BIAS), Klagenfurter Str. 5, 28359 Bremen, Germany
2
Angewandte Optik, Fachbereich Physik/Elektrotechnik, Universität Bremen, Otto Hahn Allee NW1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
3
MAPEX, Universität Bremen, Bibliothekstr. 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Chien-Hung Liu
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(22), 10533; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112210533
Received: 20 September 2021 / Revised: 19 October 2021 / Accepted: 31 October 2021 / Published: 9 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical In-Process Measurement Systems)
Optical metrology is a key element for many areas of modern production. Preferably, measurements should take place within the production line (in-process) and keep pace with production speed, even if the parts have a complex geometry or are difficult to access. The challenge for modern optical in-process measurements is, therefore, how to simultaneously make optical metrology precise, fast, robust and capable of handling geometrical complexity. The potential of individual techniques to achieve these demands can be visualized by the tetrahedron of optical metrology. Depending on the application, techniques based on interferometry or geometrical optics may have to be preferred. The paper emphasizes complexity and robustness as prime areas of improvement. Concerning interferometric techniques, we report on fast acquisition as used in holography, tailoring of coherence properties and use of Multiple simultaneous Viewing direction holography (MultiView), self reference used in Computational Shear Interferometry (CoSI) and the simultaneous use of several light sources in Multiple Aperture Shear Interferometry (MArS) based on CoSI as these techniques have proven to be particularly effective. The use of advanced approaches based on CoSI requires a transition of the description of light from the use of the well-known wave field to the coherence function of light. Techniques based on geometric optics are generally comparatively robust against environmental disturbances, and Fringe Projection (FP) is shown to be especially useful in very demanding measurement conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: in-process measurement; in situ measurement; optical metrology; quality control; interferometry; fringe projection; computational shear interferometry; coherence function; structure function; additive manufacturing in-process measurement; in situ measurement; optical metrology; quality control; interferometry; fringe projection; computational shear interferometry; coherence function; structure function; additive manufacturing
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Bergmann, R.B.; Kalms, M.; Falldorf, C. Optical In-Process Measurement: Concepts for Precise, Fast and Robust Optical Metrology for Complex Measurement Situations. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 10533. https://doi.org/10.3390/app112210533

AMA Style

Bergmann RB, Kalms M, Falldorf C. Optical In-Process Measurement: Concepts for Precise, Fast and Robust Optical Metrology for Complex Measurement Situations. Applied Sciences. 2021; 11(22):10533. https://doi.org/10.3390/app112210533

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bergmann, Ralf B., Michael Kalms, and Claas Falldorf. 2021. "Optical In-Process Measurement: Concepts for Precise, Fast and Robust Optical Metrology for Complex Measurement Situations" Applied Sciences 11, no. 22: 10533. https://doi.org/10.3390/app112210533

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop