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Article

Experimental Comparison of Three Characterization Methods for Two Phase Change Materials Suitable for Domestic Hot Water Storage

1
Laboratoire LOCIE, CNRS, Savoie Mont Blanc University, 73000 Chambéry, France
2
Laboratoire de Génie Civil et Géo-Environnement, Institut Mines-Télécom, Junia, ULR 4515–LGCgE, Lille University, Université d’Artois, 62400 Béthune, France
3
E2S UPPA, LaTEP, Pau et des Pays de l’Adour University, 64000 Pau, France
4
Polytech’Lab, Côte d’Azur University, 06103 Nice, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Andrea Frazzica
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(21), 10229; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112110229
Received: 4 October 2021 / Revised: 26 October 2021 / Accepted: 28 October 2021 / Published: 1 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Application of Phase Change Materials in Heat Storage)
This study presents an experimental comparison of three characterization methods for phase change materials (PCM). Two methods were carried out with a calorimeter, the first with direct scanning (DSC) and the second with step scanning (STEP). The third method is a fluxmetric (FM) characterization performed using a fluxmeter bench. For the three methods, paraffin RT58 and polymer PEG6000, two PCM suitable for domestic hot water (DHW) storage, were characterized. For each PCM, no significant difference was observed on the latent heat and the total energy exchanged between the three characterization methods. However, DSC and STEP methods did not enable the accurate characterization of the supercooling process observed with the FM method for polymer PEG6000. For PEG6000, the shape of the enthalpy curve of melting also differed between the experiments on the calorimeter—DSC and STEP—methods, and the FM method. Concerning the PCM comparison, RT58 and PEG6000 appeared to have an equivalent energy density but, as the mass density of PEG6000 is greater, more energy is stored inside the same volume for PEG6000. However, as PEG6000 experienced supercooling, the discharging temperature was lower than for RT58 and the material is therefore less adapted to DHW storage operating with partial phase change cycles where the PCM temperature does not decrease below 52 °C. View Full-Text
Keywords: phase change material; latent heat storage; domestic hot water; experimental characterization; thermal performances phase change material; latent heat storage; domestic hot water; experimental characterization; thermal performances
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MDPI and ACS Style

Thonon, M.; Zalewski, L.; Gibout, S.; Franquet, E.; Fraisse, G.; Pailha, M. Experimental Comparison of Three Characterization Methods for Two Phase Change Materials Suitable for Domestic Hot Water Storage. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 10229. https://doi.org/10.3390/app112110229

AMA Style

Thonon M, Zalewski L, Gibout S, Franquet E, Fraisse G, Pailha M. Experimental Comparison of Three Characterization Methods for Two Phase Change Materials Suitable for Domestic Hot Water Storage. Applied Sciences. 2021; 11(21):10229. https://doi.org/10.3390/app112110229

Chicago/Turabian Style

Thonon, Maxime, Laurent Zalewski, Stéphane Gibout, Erwin Franquet, Gilles Fraisse, and Mickael Pailha. 2021. "Experimental Comparison of Three Characterization Methods for Two Phase Change Materials Suitable for Domestic Hot Water Storage" Applied Sciences 11, no. 21: 10229. https://doi.org/10.3390/app112110229

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