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Article

Single-Leg Landings Following a Volleyball Spike May Increase the Risk of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury More Than Landing on Both-Legs

1
Faculty of Sports Science, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211, China
2
The Department of Sport, Physical Education and Health,Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong 999077, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(1), 130; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11010130
Received: 28 October 2020 / Revised: 19 December 2020 / Accepted: 20 December 2020 / Published: 25 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Biomechanics: Sport Performance and Injury Prevention)
Volleyball players often land on a single leg following a spike shot due to a shift in the center of gravity and loss of balance. Landing on a single leg following a spike may increase the probability of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. The purpose of this study was to compare and analyze the kinematics and kinetics differences during the landing phase of volleyball players using a single leg (SL) and double-leg landing (DL) following a spike shot. The data for vertical ground reaction forces (VGRF) and sagittal plane were collected. SPM analysis revealed that SL depicted a smaller knee flexion angle (about 13.8°) and hip flexion angle (about 10.8°) during the whole landing phase, a greater knee and hip power during the 16.83–20.45% (p = 0.006) and 13.01–16.26% (p = 0.008) landing phase, a greater ankle plantarflexion angle and moment during the 0–41.07% (p < 0.001) and 2.76–79.45% (p < 0.001) landing phase, a greater VGRF during the 5.87–8.25% (p = 0.029), 19.75–24.14% (p = 0.003) landing phase when compared to DL. Most of these differences fall within the time range of ACL injury (30–50 milliseconds after landing). To reduce non-contact ACL injuries, a landing strategy of consciously increasing the hip and knee flexion, and plantarflexion of the ankle should be considered by volleyball players. View Full-Text
Keywords: volleyball spike landing; sagittal biomechanics; non-contact ACL injuries; statistical parametric mapping (SPM) volleyball spike landing; sagittal biomechanics; non-contact ACL injuries; statistical parametric mapping (SPM)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Xu, D.; Jiang, X.; Cen, X.; Baker, J.S.; Gu, Y. Single-Leg Landings Following a Volleyball Spike May Increase the Risk of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury More Than Landing on Both-Legs. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 130. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11010130

AMA Style

Xu D, Jiang X, Cen X, Baker JS, Gu Y. Single-Leg Landings Following a Volleyball Spike May Increase the Risk of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury More Than Landing on Both-Legs. Applied Sciences. 2021; 11(1):130. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11010130

Chicago/Turabian Style

Xu, Datao, Xinyan Jiang, Xuanzhen Cen, Julien S. Baker, and Yaodong Gu. 2021. "Single-Leg Landings Following a Volleyball Spike May Increase the Risk of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury More Than Landing on Both-Legs" Applied Sciences 11, no. 1: 130. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11010130

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