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Short-Term Measurement of Indoor Radon Concentration in Northern Croatia

Faculty of Geotechnical Engineering, University of Zagreb, Hallerova aleja 7, 42000 Varaždin, Croatia
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Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(7), 2341; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10072341
Received: 24 February 2020 / Revised: 22 March 2020 / Accepted: 27 March 2020 / Published: 29 March 2020
(1) Background: Radon concentrations in the environment are generally very low. However, radon concentrations can be high indoors and can cause some serious health issues. The main source of indoor radon (homes, buildings and other residential objects) can be soil under the house, while other sources can be construction materials, groundwater and natural gas. Radon accumulates mainly in the lower levels of the buildings (especially low-ventilated underground levels and basements). (2) Methods: in this paper, we have measured the indoor radon concentrations at 15 locations in various objects (basements and ground floor/1st floor rooms) in the area of northern Croatia. (3) Results: the results show a higher concentration of radon in the basement area in comparison to values measured in the ground floor and first-floor rooms. The arithmetic mean (AM) and geometric mean (GM) of basement rooms were 70.9 ± 38.8 Bq/m3 and 61.2 ± 2.2 Bq/m3 compared to ground floor and first-floor rooms 42.5 ± 30.8 Bq/m3 and 32.8 ± 2.9 Bq/m3, respectively. (4) Conclusions: results obtained (AM and GM values) are within the maximal allowed values (300 Bq/m3) according to the Euroatom Directive. However, there are periods when maximum radon concentration exceeds 300 Bq/m3. Indoor radon concentrations vary with the occupancy of the rooms and it is evident that the ventilation has significant effect on the reduction of concentration. View Full-Text
Keywords: radon concentrations; environment; indoor radon measurements; ventilation radon concentrations; environment; indoor radon measurements; ventilation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ptiček Siročić, A.; Stanko, D.; Sakač, N.; Dogančić, D.; Trojko, T. Short-Term Measurement of Indoor Radon Concentration in Northern Croatia. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 2341. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10072341

AMA Style

Ptiček Siročić A, Stanko D, Sakač N, Dogančić D, Trojko T. Short-Term Measurement of Indoor Radon Concentration in Northern Croatia. Applied Sciences. 2020; 10(7):2341. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10072341

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ptiček Siročić, Anita, Davor Stanko, Nikola Sakač, Dragana Dogančić, and Tomislav Trojko. 2020. "Short-Term Measurement of Indoor Radon Concentration in Northern Croatia" Applied Sciences 10, no. 7: 2341. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10072341

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