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Open AccessArticle

Assessment of Cytotoxicity of Magnesium Oxide and Magnesium Hydroxide Nanoparticles using the Electric Cell-Substrate Impedance Sensing

1
Department of Energy and Environmental Systems, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, NC 27411, USA
2
Engineering Research Center for Revolutionized Metallic Biomaterials, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, NC 27411, USA
3
Department of Chemical, Biological and Bioengineering, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, NC 27411, USA
4
Department of Animal Sciences, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, NC 27411, USA
5
Department of Mechanical Engineering, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, NC 27411, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(6), 2114; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10062114
Received: 2 March 2020 / Revised: 17 March 2020 / Accepted: 18 March 2020 / Published: 20 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering)
Magnesium (Mg)-based alloys have the potential for bone repair due to their properties of biodegradation, biocompatibility, and structural stability, which can eliminate the requirement for a second surgery for the removal of the implant. Nevertheless, uncontrolled degradation rate and possible cytotoxicity of the corrosion products at the implant sites are known current challenges for clinical applications. In this study, we assessed in vitro cytotoxicity of different concentrations (0 to 50 mM) of possible corrosion products in the form of magnesium oxide (MgO) and magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2) nanoparticles (NPs) in human fetal osteoblast (hFOB) 1.19 cells. We measured cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and cytotoxicity using a real-time, label-free, non-invasive electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system. Our results suggest that 1 mM concentrations of MgO/Mg(OH)2 NPs are tolerable in hFOB 1.19 cells. Based on our findings, we propose the development of innovative biodegradable Mg-based alloys for further in vivo animal testing and clinical trials in orthopedics. View Full-Text
Keywords: cytotoxicity; human fetal osteoblast (hFOB) 1.19 cells; electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system cytotoxicity; human fetal osteoblast (hFOB) 1.19 cells; electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pallavi, M.; Waterman, J.; Koo, Y.; Sankar, J.; Yun, Y. Assessment of Cytotoxicity of Magnesium Oxide and Magnesium Hydroxide Nanoparticles using the Electric Cell-Substrate Impedance Sensing. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 2114. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10062114

AMA Style

Pallavi M, Waterman J, Koo Y, Sankar J, Yun Y. Assessment of Cytotoxicity of Magnesium Oxide and Magnesium Hydroxide Nanoparticles using the Electric Cell-Substrate Impedance Sensing. Applied Sciences. 2020; 10(6):2114. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10062114

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pallavi, Manishi; Waterman, Jenora; Koo, Youngmi; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung. 2020. "Assessment of Cytotoxicity of Magnesium Oxide and Magnesium Hydroxide Nanoparticles using the Electric Cell-Substrate Impedance Sensing" Appl. Sci. 10, no. 6: 2114. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10062114

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