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Open AccessArticle

Experiment on Interaction of Abutment, Steel H-Pile and Soil in Integral Abutment Jointless Bridges (IAJBs) under Low-Cycle Pseudo-Static Displacement Loads

1
Key Lab of Fujian Province on Prevention Disaster of Civil Engineering, College of Civil Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108, China
2
College of Civil Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108, China
3
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 3200 N Cramer Street, Milwaukee, WI 53211, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(4), 1358; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10041358
Received: 31 January 2020 / Revised: 10 February 2020 / Accepted: 13 February 2020 / Published: 17 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessing and Extending the Service Life of Bridges)
Soil-abutment or soil-pile interactions under cyclic static loads have been widely studied in integral abutment jointless bridges (IAJBs). However, the IAJB has the combinational interaction of soil-abutment and soil-pile, and the soil-abutment-pile interaction is lack of comprehensively study. Therefore, a reciprocating low-cycle pseudo-static test was carried out under an cyclic horizontal displacement load (DL) to gain insight into the mechanical behavior of the soil-abutment-pile system. Test results indicate that the earth pressure of backfill behind abutment has the ratcheting effect, which induced a large earth pressure. The soil-abutment-pile system has a favorable energy dissipation capacity and seismic behavior with relatively large equivalent viscous damping. The accumulative horizontal deformation in pile will be occurred by the effect of abutment and unbalance soil pressure of backfill. The test shows that the maximum horizontal deformation of pile occurs in the pile depth of 1.0b~3.0b of pile body rather than at the pile head due to the accumulative deformation of pile, which is significantly different from those of previous test results of soil-pile interaction. The time-history curve for abutment is relatively symmetrical and its accumulative deformation is small. However, the time-history curve of pile is asymmetrical and its accumulative deformation is dramatically large. The traditional theory of deformation applies only to the calculation of noncumulative deformation of pile, and the influence of accumulative deformation should be considered in practical engineering. A significant difference of inclinations in the positive and negative directions increases when the displacement load is relatively large. The rotation of abutment when bridge expands is larger than that when bridge contracts due to earth pressure of backfill. View Full-Text
Keywords: integral abutment jointless bridges (IAJBs); steel H-pile; soil-abutment-pile interaction; pseudo-static; ratcheting effect; accumulative deformation integral abutment jointless bridges (IAJBs); steel H-pile; soil-abutment-pile interaction; pseudo-static; ratcheting effect; accumulative deformation
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Huang, F.; Shan, Y.; Chen, G.; Lin, Y.; Tabatabai, H.; Briseghella, B. Experiment on Interaction of Abutment, Steel H-Pile and Soil in Integral Abutment Jointless Bridges (IAJBs) under Low-Cycle Pseudo-Static Displacement Loads. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 1358.

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