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Open AccessArticle

A New Perspective of Multiple Roller Compaction of Microcrystalline Cellulose for Overcoming Re-Compression Drawbacks in Tableting Processing

1
Chemical Engineering Department, School of Engineering, University of Jordan, Amman 11942, Jordan
2
Research and Innovation Centre, The Jordanian Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Company (JPM), P.O. Box 94, Naor 11710, Jordan
3
School of Science, Faculty of Engineering & Science, University of Greenwich, Medway Campus, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(14), 4787; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10144787
Received: 10 June 2020 / Revised: 8 July 2020 / Accepted: 10 July 2020 / Published: 12 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Materials)
In this paper, new scientific insights in relation to the re-compaction of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC; Avicel®® PH-101) under specific compaction conditions are reported. MCC was subjected to multiple compaction cycles (1st, 2nd, and 3rd) under high compaction pressures, up to 20,000 kPa, using a roller compactor of 100 kg/h capacity. Initially, granules from the 1st and 2nd compaction cycles produced tablets with lower crushing strength compared to those made from the original non-compacted MCC. Tablet weakness was found to be correlated to the generation of a higher intra-granular pore size (diameter) and hence higher tablet porosity compared to that of the original MCC particles. Using Kawakita and Heckel compression analyses, it is suggested that such behavior is attributed to the formation of harder granules of re-compressed powder with a larger diameter than non-compacted MCC particles. Moreover, these granules resulted in a reduction in powder bed volume after the powders were subjected to the 1st and 2nd compaction cycles. Surprisingly, granules resulting from the 3rd compaction cycle produced tablets displaying a higher crushing force than non-compacted MCC. Results from compression analysis indicated a reduction in both the intra-granular pore size (diameter) and in tablet porosity of Avicel PH-101-3rd compaction cycle compared to that of the original non-compacted MCC. It is concluded that intense compression causes shedding of one or more layer from MCC fibers exposing new surfaces with strong binding ability. The foregoing results infer that intensified roller compaction can be employed to improve MCC powder compactibility without any deleterious effects on compact strength. View Full-Text
Keywords: microcrystalline cellulose; Avicel; excipient; workability; compressibility; crushing strength; roller compaction; multiple compaction; Kawakita and Heckel microcrystalline cellulose; Avicel; excipient; workability; compressibility; crushing strength; roller compaction; multiple compaction; Kawakita and Heckel
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MDPI and ACS Style

Abu Fara, D.; Rashid, I.; Al-Hmoud, L.; Chowdhry, B.Z.; Badwan, A.A. A New Perspective of Multiple Roller Compaction of Microcrystalline Cellulose for Overcoming Re-Compression Drawbacks in Tableting Processing. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 4787. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10144787

AMA Style

Abu Fara D, Rashid I, Al-Hmoud L, Chowdhry BZ, Badwan AA. A New Perspective of Multiple Roller Compaction of Microcrystalline Cellulose for Overcoming Re-Compression Drawbacks in Tableting Processing. Applied Sciences. 2020; 10(14):4787. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10144787

Chicago/Turabian Style

Abu Fara, Deeb; Rashid, Iyad; Al-Hmoud, Linda; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Badwan, Adnan A. 2020. "A New Perspective of Multiple Roller Compaction of Microcrystalline Cellulose for Overcoming Re-Compression Drawbacks in Tableting Processing" Appl. Sci. 10, no. 14: 4787. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10144787

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