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Open AccessArticle

Static Strength of Friction-Type High-Strength Bolted T-Stub Connections under Shear and Compression

1
School of Transportation and Civil Engineering, Shandong Jiaotong University, Jinan 250357, China
2
School of Civil Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061, China
3
China Academy of Transportation Sciences, Beijing 100081, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(10), 3600; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10103600
Received: 14 April 2020 / Revised: 16 May 2020 / Accepted: 19 May 2020 / Published: 22 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Mechanical Engineering)
The friction-type high-strength bolted (FHSB) T-stub connection has been widely used in steel structures, due to their good fatigue resistance and ease of installation. While the current studies on FHSB T-stub connections mainly focus on the structural behaviors under both shear and tensile force, no research has been reported on the mechanical responses of the connections under the combined effects of shear and compression. To make up for this gap, this paper presents a novel FHSB T-stub connection, which is simple in structure, definite in load condition, and easy to construct. Static load tests were carried out on 21 specimens under different shear–compression ratios, and the finite-element (FE) models were created for each specimen. The failure modes, initial friction loads and ultimate strengths of the specimens were compared in details. Then, 144 FE models were adopted to analyze the effects of the friction coefficient, shear–compression ratio, bolt diameter and clamping force on the initial friction load and ultimate strength. The results showed that the FHSB T-stub connection under shear and compression mainly suffers from bolt shearing failure. The load–displacement curve generally covers the elastic, yield, hardening and failure stage. If the shear–compression ratio is small and the friction coefficient is large, its curve only contains the elastic and failure stage. The friction coefficient and shear–compression ratio have great impacts on the initial friction load and ultimate strength. For every 1 mm increase in bolt diameter, the initial friction load increased by about 10%, while the ultimate strength increased by about 8.5%. For each 10% increase/decrease of the design clamping force, the initial friction load decreases/increases by 7.8%, while the ultimate load remains basically the same. The proposed formula of shear capacity and self-lock angles of FHSB T-stub connection can be applied to the design of CSS-enhanced prestressed concrete continuous box girder bridges (PSC-CBGBs) and diagonal bracing. View Full-Text
Keywords: T-stub connection; high-strength bolted (HSB) connection; shear and compression; initial friction load; ultimate strength; finite element method (FEM) T-stub connection; high-strength bolted (HSB) connection; shear and compression; initial friction load; ultimate strength; finite element method (FEM)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Xu, G.; Wang, Y.; Du, Y.; Zhao, W.; Wang, L. Static Strength of Friction-Type High-Strength Bolted T-Stub Connections under Shear and Compression. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 3600.

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