Next Article in Journal
Adaptive Model-Free Coupling Controller Design for Multi-Axis Motion Systems
Previous Article in Journal
An ANN-Based Approach for Prediction of Sufficient Seismic Gap between Adjacent Buildings Prone to Earthquake-Induced Pounding
Previous Article in Special Issue
EMG-Assisted Algorithm to Account for Shoulder Muscles Co-Contraction in Overhead Manual Handling
Open AccessArticle

Effects of Basketball Shoe Midsole Hardness on Lower Extremity Biomechanics and Perception during Drop Jumping from Different Heights

1
Physical Education and Sports Science Academic Group, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637616, Singapore
2
Institute for Sports Research, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore
3
Sports Science and Engineering Laboratory, Xtep Co. Ltd., Xiamen 361000, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(10), 3594; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10103594
Received: 30 April 2020 / Revised: 19 May 2020 / Accepted: 20 May 2020 / Published: 22 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Biomechanics in Sport, Rehabilitation and Ergonomy)
This study investigated how midsole hardness of basketball footwear affects lower extremity biomechanics and impacts perception in drop vertical jumps. Eighteen male basketball players performed drop vertical jumps from three heights (31 cm, 46 cm, 61 cm) in basketball shoes of different midsole hardness (50, 60 Asker C). Biomechanical variables of the lower extremity and subjective perception were measured. This study found a significant drop height effect on the lower extremity biomechanics (p < 0.05), with greater ground reaction forces, joint kinetics, and prelanding muscle activation levels observed at higher drop heights. Basketball shoes with a softer midsole led to higher forefoot peak force (p = 0.028) amid lower rearfoot peak force (p = 0.046), lower peak flexion moments at the ankle (p = 0.024) and hip joints (p = 0.029), and greater prelanding muscle activation in the rectus femoris (p = 0.042) and tibialis anterior (p = 0.043). It is concluded that changing midsole hardness within a commercially relevant range triggered a different prelanding muscle activation strategy and hence altered the magnitudes of ground reaction forces and joint loadings during landing. Subjectively, participants perceived higher landing impacts with greater drop heights, though the strength of the associations were weak. View Full-Text
Keywords: range of motion; ground reaction force; electromyography; work; perception range of motion; ground reaction force; electromyography; work; perception
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Alonzo, R.; Teo, C.; Pan, J.W.; Teng, P.S.P.; Sterzing, T.; Kong, P.W. Effects of Basketball Shoe Midsole Hardness on Lower Extremity Biomechanics and Perception during Drop Jumping from Different Heights. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 3594.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop