Next Article in Journal
Nature Conservation and Nature-Based Tourism: A Paradox?
Previous Article in Journal
Diatom Deformities and Tolerance to Cadmium Contamination in Four Species
Open AccessArticle

Tall Wheatgrass (Thinopyrum ponticum): Flood Resilience, Growth Response to Sea Water Immersion, and Its Capacity for Erosion and Flooding Control of Coastal Areas

Department of Plant Production, Technical University of Varna, 1 Studentska St, 9010 Varna, Bulgaria
Environments 2019, 6(9), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments6090103
Received: 30 June 2019 / Revised: 11 August 2019 / Accepted: 3 September 2019 / Published: 5 September 2019
Integrated coastal zone management proposes nature-based mitigation strategies based on the replacement of artificial coastal stabilization and protection structures with dunes stabilized with plant species. These psammophytes stabilize sands and act as supporters, increasing dunes’ ability to reduce storm damages and effectively minimize erosion with minimal negative impacts to natural ecosystems. That is why searching for native salt-tolerant plants with extensive root systems and studying their capacity for erosion and flooding control is fundamental to the practice of ecologically-sound ecosystem services. The aim of the present study is to define the effects of flooding stress on a number of wheatgrass (Thinopyrum ponticum) plant life aspects (survival ability, viability, and growth response) in order to determine wheatgrass’s capacity as dune stabilizer. Conducted experiments established that T. ponticum was very tolerant to immersion impact and salt and oxygen deficiency stress, and its rhizomes were able to regenerate after 30 days in seawater. The temporal expression of its survival is presented as critical decomposition time (CDT) by linking the maximum duration of floods along the Bulgarian Black Sea Coast and the resilience of tall wheatgrass in flooding simulations. A statistical analysis of the experimental data demonstrated that immersion in sea water increases rhizome viability, biomass, and allocation to root biomass, whereas other factors, such as the duration of immersion, salinity, and temperatures of sea water have no significant effect. According to flood resilience and growth response to sea water submergence, T. ponticum demonstrated high potential to be a dune stabilizer. View Full-Text
Keywords: wheatgrass; Thinopyrum ponticum; immersion tolerance; viability; dune stabilization; erosion and flooding control; flooding simulations; salt tolerance; ecosystem services wheatgrass; Thinopyrum ponticum; immersion tolerance; viability; dune stabilization; erosion and flooding control; flooding simulations; salt tolerance; ecosystem services
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Vergiev, S. Tall Wheatgrass (Thinopyrum ponticum): Flood Resilience, Growth Response to Sea Water Immersion, and Its Capacity for Erosion and Flooding Control of Coastal Areas. Environments 2019, 6, 103.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop