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Visual Comfort Assessment in an Industrial Environment: A Case Study

1
Department of Building Physics, Institute of Architectural Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Kosice, 04200 Kosice, Slovakia
2
Department of Architecture and Building Structures, Institute of Architectural Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Kosice, 04200 Kosice, Slovakia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Environments 2019, 6(5), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments6050054
Received: 16 April 2019 / Revised: 20 May 2019 / Accepted: 21 May 2019 / Published: 23 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Environmental Engineering II)
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Abstract

Air, water, soil, and light are important factors in the environment. Light is the only elementary part of life that has become an almost irreplaceable part of life. Because man is more connected with the interior, the task is to ensure that natural daylight in the interior is as high as possible. Industrial lighting is currently at a level that in many cases does not meet the requirements of legislation and standards. Optimal environmental conditions depend on the purpose for which the environment is intended. Since toplighting is largely involved in the overall lighting climate, the purpose of this paper is to evaluate the visual comfort in a selected industrial hall with two types of glazing at the saddle skylight. In the study, measured values in the hall were used as boundary conditions in the simulation program Radiance The program evaluated the visual comfort for two types of sky by the Guth VCP method. The results show that the use of diffuse glazing instead of simple wire glazing reduces the brightness and glare levels, but that people’s satisfaction with visual comfort is greater with wire glazing. Furthermore, the model of the hall can be used to calculate light conditions for other types of arches as well as to compare other types of skylights. An alternative to diffusing glazing could also be verified for side windows. View Full-Text
Keywords: visual comfort; daylighting; simulation; industry; halls; environment visual comfort; daylighting; simulation; industry; halls; environment
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Dolnikova, E.; Katunsky, D. Visual Comfort Assessment in an Industrial Environment: A Case Study. Environments 2019, 6, 54.

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