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Impact of Differences in Land Management on Natural Vegetation in Semi-Dry Areas: The Case Study of the Adi Zaboy Watershed in the Kilite Awlaelo District, Eastern Tigray Region, Ethiopia

1
Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Inada-cho, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555, Japan
2
College of Dry Land Agriculture and Natural Resources, Mekelle University, Tigray Region, Mekelle, P. O. Box 231, Ethiopia
3
Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences, 1-1 Ohwashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8686, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Environments 2019, 6(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments6010002
Received: 29 October 2018 / Revised: 13 December 2018 / Accepted: 19 December 2018 / Published: 21 December 2018
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Abstract

The search for a sustainable land management has become a universal issue. It is especially necessary to discuss sustainable land management and to secure a site with enough feed supply to improve the lives of the farmers in the Ethiopian Highlands. This research studied the Adi Zaboy watershed in Tigray in order to reveal the changes in land management, assess how the different forms of land management affected the vegetation through unsupervised classification and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) analysis with geographic information system (GIS) 10.5 using a WorldView-2 satellite image taken in September 2016 and field investigation, and consider how to allow both environmental preservation and sustainable use of feed resources. The land management types at the research site were classified as “seasonally-closed grazing land”, “prohibited grazing and protected forest land”, and “free grazing land”. On comparing the NDVI of each type of land management, it was found that the seasonally-closed grazing land makes it highly possible to secure and supply feed resources by limiting the grazing period. The expansion of the prohibited grazing and protected forest land is likely to tighten the restriction on the use of resources. Therefore, sustainable land management to secure feed resources may be possible by securing and actively using seasonally-closed grazing land, securing feed by a cut-and-carry, and using satellite images and GIS. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ethiopia; sustainability; land management; satellite image; normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) Ethiopia; sustainability; land management; satellite image; normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI)
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Ogawa, R.; Hirata, M.; Gebremedhin, B.G.; Uchida, S.; Sakai, T.; Koda, K.; Takenaka, K. Impact of Differences in Land Management on Natural Vegetation in Semi-Dry Areas: The Case Study of the Adi Zaboy Watershed in the Kilite Awlaelo District, Eastern Tigray Region, Ethiopia. Environments 2019, 6, 2.

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