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Attention Network in Interpreters: The Role of Training and Experience

1
Brussels Institute for Applied Linguistics, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussel, Belgium
2
Centre for Neurosciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussel, Belgium
3
Centre for Linguistics, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussel, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Behav. Sci. 2019, 9(4), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs9040043
Received: 12 February 2019 / Revised: 20 March 2019 / Accepted: 16 April 2019 / Published: 23 April 2019
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Abstract

The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship found between interpreting training and experience and the attentional network components: Alerting, orienting, and executive attention using the Attention Network Test (ANT). In the current study we tested three groups of interpreting students, translation students, and professional interpreters as specific forms of multilingual expertise. The student groups were tested longitudinally at the beginning and the end of their Master’s programme. The professional interpreters were tested only one point in time. The results showed different attention network dynamics for the interpreting students compared to the translation students regarding alertness and executive network. First, the interpreting students showed a higher conflict effect when the alert cue was presented as well as a reduced accuracy compared to translation students. Second, the interpreting training had less effect on alerting than the translation training. Finally, two student groups showed a faster response time in conflict effect than the professional interpreters. In contrast, the professional interpreters scored a higher accuracy than two-student groups specifically in an incongruent alert condition, which confirms that they used a different responding strategy. View Full-Text
Keywords: attention network; alerting; orienting; executive functioning; interpreting; translation; bilingualism; inhibition attention network; alerting; orienting; executive functioning; interpreting; translation; bilingualism; inhibition
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Nour, S.; Struys, E.; Stengers, H. Attention Network in Interpreters: The Role of Training and Experience. Behav. Sci. 2019, 9, 43.

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