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Open AccessArticle

The Intersectionality of Race and Trajectories of African Women into the Nursing Career in the United States

Department of Sociology, McDaniel College, Westminster, MD 21157, USA
Behav. Sci. 2020, 10(4), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10040069
Received: 25 February 2020 / Revised: 20 March 2020 / Accepted: 22 March 2020 / Published: 25 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migration, Globalization and Health in Africa and the Diaspora)
This paper uses narratives of Malawian-born registered nurses working in the United States to capture pathways through which African women are entering the nursing profession. The paper highlights how race, immigrant status and language acts as potential sources of discrimination within the nursing profession. The paper utilizes intersectionality as a feminist framework that places black women’s experiences at the center of analysis to capture the multidimensionality of their experiences. The qualitative study highlights the multiple pathways through which African immigrant women enter the nursing profession and how being African, immigrant female nurses predisposes them to discrimination in their interactions with employment institutions and patients. Focusing on African women’s experiences as recent immigrants enriches the global migration narrative and helps contextualize the intersectionality of race, gender and discrimination within particular contexts. View Full-Text
Keywords: intersectionality; globalization; migration; nursing; race; gender; discrimination; language intersectionality; globalization; migration; nursing; race; gender; discrimination; language
MDPI and ACS Style

Semu, L.L. The Intersectionality of Race and Trajectories of African Women into the Nursing Career in the United States. Behav. Sci. 2020, 10, 69.

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