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Sleep and Delirium in Pediatric Critical Illness: What Is the Relationship?

1
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Rush Children’s Hospital, Rush University Medical Center, 1750 W. Harrison Street, Chicago, IL 606012, USA
2
Pediatric Sleep Medicine, Rush Children’s Hospital, Rush University Medical Center, 1750 W. Harrison Street, Chicago, IL 606012, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Med. Sci. 2018, 6(4), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci6040090
Received: 7 August 2018 / Revised: 28 September 2018 / Accepted: 3 October 2018 / Published: 10 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Updates in Pediatric Sleep and Child Psychiatry)
With growing recognition of pediatric delirium in pediatric critical illness there has also been increased investigation into improving recognition and determining potential risk factors. Disturbed sleep has been assumed to be one of the key risk factors leading to delirium and is commonplace in the pediatric critical care setting as the nature of intensive care requires frequent and invasive monitoring and interventions. However, this relationship between sleep and delirium in pediatric critical illness has not been definitively established and may, instead, reflect significant overlap in risk factors and consequences of underlying neurologic dysfunction. We aim to review the existing tools for evaluation of sleep and delirium in the pediatric critical care setting and review findings from recent investigations with application of these measures in the pediatric intensive care unit. View Full-Text
Keywords: Acute illness; children; circadian disturbance; mechanical ventilation; melatonin; non-pharmacologic management; pediatric intensive care unit; screening; sedation Acute illness; children; circadian disturbance; mechanical ventilation; melatonin; non-pharmacologic management; pediatric intensive care unit; screening; sedation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Calandriello, A.; Tylka, J.C.; Patwari, P.P. Sleep and Delirium in Pediatric Critical Illness: What Is the Relationship? Med. Sci. 2018, 6, 90.

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