Next Article in Journal
Analysis of Built-Up Areas of Small Polish Cities with the Use of Deep Learning and Geographically Weighted Regression
Previous Article in Journal
Erratum: Merisalu et al. A Framework for Risk-Based Cost–Benefit Analysis for Decision Support on Hydrogeological Risks in Underground Construction. Geosciences 2021, 11, 82
Previous Article in Special Issue
Influence of Tsunami Aspect Ratio on Near and Far-Field Tsunami Amplitude
Article

A Review on Historical Tsunamis in the Canary Islands: Implications for Tsunami Risk Reduction

1
Instituto Geológico y Minero de España (IGME, CSIC), Unidad Territorial de Canarias, Alonso Alvarado, 43, 2A, 35003 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
2
Departamento de Geografía, Campus de Guajara, Universidad de La Laguna, 38207 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain
3
Museo de Ciencias Naturales de Tenerife, Organismo Autónomo de Museos y Centros, Fuente Morales, 1, 38003 Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Tenerife, Spain
4
Instituto Geológico y Minero de España (IGME, CSIC), Ríos Rosas, 23, 28003 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Jesus Martinez-Frias, Angela Santos and Miguel Llorente Isidro
Geosciences 2021, 11(5), 222; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11050222
Received: 31 March 2021 / Revised: 4 May 2021 / Accepted: 18 May 2021 / Published: 20 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tsunami Science and Future Mitigation Strategies)
The analysis of the historical documentary sources together with evidence from the geological record is essential to understand the impact and processes triggered by tsunamis on the Canary Islands. This archipelago has been affected by tsunamis caused by different geological processes, of which the most studied have been those generated by prehistoric mega-landslides. However, there is also evidence of those produced by distant tsunamigenic sources. An exhaustive review of all documentation available was made, identifying the existence of at least four seismically triggered tsunami episodes (1755, 1761, 1941 and 1969), the majority with an epicenter in the Azores-Gibraltar boundary. In this work, several tsunamis are cited for the first time, such as the one produced by the Argaga (La Gomera) landslide in 2020. Other episodes historically identified as tsunamis are discarded as they corresponded to other geological events. The effects of most historic tsunamis have gone unnoticed, having occurred in epochs of sparsely populated coastal areas. But their study allows us to infer the need for the archipelago authorities to establish preventive measures to avoid possible damage from tsunamis, especially if we consider the presently high population density of the Canarian littoral. View Full-Text
Keywords: historical sources; catalogue; tsunami; mitigation; Canary Island; extreme wave event historical sources; catalogue; tsunami; mitigation; Canary Island; extreme wave event
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Galindo, I.; Romero, C.; Martín-González, E.; Vegas, J.; Sánchez, N. A Review on Historical Tsunamis in the Canary Islands: Implications for Tsunami Risk Reduction. Geosciences 2021, 11, 222. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11050222

AMA Style

Galindo I, Romero C, Martín-González E, Vegas J, Sánchez N. A Review on Historical Tsunamis in the Canary Islands: Implications for Tsunami Risk Reduction. Geosciences. 2021; 11(5):222. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11050222

Chicago/Turabian Style

Galindo, Inés, Carmen Romero, Esther Martín-González, Juana Vegas, and Nieves Sánchez. 2021. "A Review on Historical Tsunamis in the Canary Islands: Implications for Tsunami Risk Reduction" Geosciences 11, no. 5: 222. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11050222

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop