Next Article in Journal
Predicting the Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Clayey Soils and Clayey or Silty Sands
Next Article in Special Issue
Investigating the Geochemical Controls on Pb Bioaccessibility in Urban Agricultural Soils to Inform Sustainable Site Management
Previous Article in Journal
Metal(loid)s Transport in Hydrographic Networks of Mining Basins: The Case of the La Carolina Mining District (Southeast Spain)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Cadmium Pollution in the Tourism Environment: A Literature Review
Open AccessArticle

Biogeochemistry of Household Dust Samples Collected from Private Homes of a Portuguese Industrial City

1
Departamento de Ciências da Terra, Instituto de Ciências da Terra, Campus de Gualtar, Polo da Universidade do Minho, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal
2
Departmento de Geociências, GEOBIOTEC, Campus Universitário de Santiago, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
3
British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK
4
CNRS, IRD, INRAE, Collège de France, Aix-Marseille Univ., CEREGE, BP 80, 13545 Aix en Provence, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Geosciences 2020, 10(10), 392; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10100392
Received: 10 September 2020 / Revised: 23 September 2020 / Accepted: 29 September 2020 / Published: 1 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perspectives on Environment and Human Health)
The main objectives of the present study were to (i) investigate the effects of mineralogy and solid-phase distribution on element bioaccessibility and (ii) perform a risk assessment to calculate the risks to human health via the ingestion pathway. Multiple discriminant analysis showed that the dust chemistry discriminates between indoor and outdoor samples. The solid-phase distribution of the elements in indoor dust indicated that a large proportion of zinc, nickel, lead, copper, and cobalt is associated with an aluminum oxy-hydroxides component, formed by the weathering of aluminum silicates. This component, which seems to influence the mobility of many trace elements, was identified for a group of indoor dust samples that probably had a considerable contribution from outdoor dust. An iron oxide component consisted of the highest percentage of chromium, arsenic, antimony, and tin, indicating low mobility for these elements. The bioaccessible fraction in the stomach phase from the unified BARGE method was generally high in zinc, cadmium, and lead and low in nickel, cobalt, copper, chromium, and antimony. Unlike other potentially toxic elements, copper and nickel associated with aluminum oxy-hydroxides and calcium carbonates were not extracted by the stomach solutions. These trace elements possibly form stable complexes with gastric fluid constituents such as pepsin and amino acid. Lead had a hazard quotient >1, which indicates the risk of non-carcinogenic health effects, especially for children. View Full-Text
Keywords: potentially toxic elements; oral bioaccessibility; solid-phase distribution; human exposure; risk assessment potentially toxic elements; oral bioaccessibility; solid-phase distribution; human exposure; risk assessment
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Marinho-Reis, A.P.; Costa, C.; Rocha, F.; Cave, M.; Wragg, J.; Valente, T.; Sequeira-Braga, A.; Noack, Y. Biogeochemistry of Household Dust Samples Collected from Private Homes of a Portuguese Industrial City. Geosciences 2020, 10, 392. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10100392

AMA Style

Marinho-Reis AP, Costa C, Rocha F, Cave M, Wragg J, Valente T, Sequeira-Braga A, Noack Y. Biogeochemistry of Household Dust Samples Collected from Private Homes of a Portuguese Industrial City. Geosciences. 2020; 10(10):392. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10100392

Chicago/Turabian Style

Marinho-Reis, Amélia P.; Costa, Cristiana; Rocha, Fernando; Cave, Mark; Wragg, Joanna; Valente, Teresa; Sequeira-Braga, Amália; Noack, Yves. 2020. "Biogeochemistry of Household Dust Samples Collected from Private Homes of a Portuguese Industrial City" Geosciences 10, no. 10: 392. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10100392

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop