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Open AccessArticle

The Effects of Reproductive Disorders, Parity, and Litter Size on Milk Yield of Serrana Goats

1
Animal and Veterinary Research Centre (CECAV), University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Quinta de Prados, 5370-801 Vila Real, Portugal
2
Department of Animal Production, University of Córdoba, Campus de Rabanales, 14071 Córdoba, Spain
3
Mountain Research Centre (CIMO), School of Agriculture, Polytechnic Institute of Bragança (IPB), Campus de Santa Apolónia, 5300-253 Bragança, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Animals 2019, 9(11), 968; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9110968
Received: 21 October 2019 / Revised: 8 November 2019 / Accepted: 11 November 2019 / Published: 13 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reproductive Management of Sheep and Goats)
This study aimed to evaluate the effects of reproductive disorders, parity, and litter size on a 150-day standardized milk yield of the Transmontano ecotype of the Serrana goat breed (a dual purpose breed) over a three decade period. The 150-day standardized milk yield was significantly influenced by all studied factors and their interactions. The milk yield reduction due to reproductive disorders was more intense in primiparous than multiparous goats, and in primiparous or multiparous goats of the Transmontano ecotype presenting multiple fetuses, than in those presenting singletons. This milk production pattern proves that the lactation following abortion is viable for production purposes and an improvement of production system management can play an important role in mitigating milk yield losses.
Several reproductive factors may affect milk yield in goats. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of reproductive disorders, parity, and litter size, and their interactions on the 150-day standardized milk yield (SMY150) of low-producing dairy goats extensively raised. A total of 148,084 lactations between 1993 and 2015 were obtained from data of the Genpro pedigree records of the Transmontano ecotype of Serrana goat breed. The presence or absence of reproductive disorders (RD) from late (>half) pregnancy (abortions followed by lactation) or at kidding, number of fetuses (single vs. multiple), and parity (primiparous vs. multiparous) of the Transmontano ecotype of Serrana goat were used as fixed effects to fit a general linear model for a SMY150 output. A significant effect (p < 0.001) of all factors on SMY150, as well as three-way interactions, were observed. The SMY150 reduction subsequent to RD was 3.7% for multiparous and 9.6% for primiparous goats carrying singletons, and 14.1% for multiparous and 18.8% primiparous goats carrying multiple fetuses. It was concluded that a new lactation following abortion occurrence is viable for production purpose in low-producing dairy goats under pastoralism. Nevertheless, the impact of RD on SMY150 varied according to the number of fetuses and the parity of the Transmontano ecotype of Serrana goats. This information should be used in decision-making practices regarding reproductive and herd health management. View Full-Text
Keywords: abortion; benchmarking; goats; kidding; pregnancy; prolificacy; milk production abortion; benchmarking; goats; kidding; pregnancy; prolificacy; milk production
MDPI and ACS Style

Margatho, G.; Rodríguez-Estévez, V.; Quintas, H.; Simões, J. The Effects of Reproductive Disorders, Parity, and Litter Size on Milk Yield of Serrana Goats. Animals 2019, 9, 968.

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