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Article

Effect of a Synbiotic Mix on Intestinal Structural Changes, and Salmonella Typhimurium and Clostridium Perfringens Colonization in Broiler Chickens

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Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste (CIBNOR), Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 195, Playa Palo de Santa Rita Sur 23096 La Paz, BCS, Mexico
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Departamento de Ciencias de la Salud, Centro Universitario de Los Altos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Av. Rafael Casillas Aceves 1200, Tepatitlán de Morelos 47620, Jalisco, Mexico
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Departamento de Ciencias Biomédicas, Centro Universitario de Tonalá, Universidad de Guadalajara, Nuevo Perif. Ote. 555, Ejido San José, Tateposco 45425 Tonalá, Jalisco, Mexico
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Departamento de Farmacobiología, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenierías, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Gral. Marcelino García Barragán 1421, Olímpica 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
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Área Académica de Química, Instituto de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería, Ciudad del Conocimiento, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Abasolo 600, Centro 42000, Pachuca de Soto, Hidalgo, Mexico
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
This study is dedicated in memory of the late Dr. Hugo Avalos.
Animals 2019, 9(10), 777; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9100777
Received: 13 August 2019 / Revised: 25 September 2019 / Accepted: 1 October 2019 / Published: 10 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Poultry Microbiology and Immunology)
In Mexico, the poultry industry uses antibiotics to improve meat production through increased feed conversion, growth rate promotion, and disease prevention. Nevertheless, due to the negative effects of antibiotic overuse and abuse, alternative strategies are required. Probiotics, Prebiotics, and Synbiotics are used as feed additives to maintain health and performance status in poultry production and have become a common method in preventing various gut diseases, but the mechanisms of how these mixtures promote animal health are still unclear. This work studies whether a Synbiotic, besides modulating the gut microbiota, can modify the intestinal mucosa ultrastructure, and if this modification can promote health conditions without affecting zootechnical parameters in broilers infected with Salmonella Typhimurium and Clostridium perfringens. Our results show that broilers treated with the Synbiotic, whether infected with pathogens or not, had healthier intestinal mucosa. The Synbiotic mix promotes structural changes in the intestinal mucosa, which in turn promotes the capacity to resist intestinal infections caused by S. Typhimurium and C. perfringens in broilers.
Synbiotics can prevent gastrointestinal infections in broilers. This work studies the effect of a Synbiotic on broilers. One-day-old male broilers were divided into groups: Control; Synbiotic; Synbiotic + S. Typhimurium; Synbiotic + C. perfringens; Synbiotic + S. Typhimurium + C. perfringens; S. Typhimurium; C. perfringens; and S. Typhimurium + C. perfringens. Histopathological analysis revealed that the Synbiotic promoted longer villi, less deep crypts, and better villi-crypt ratio. Broilers treated with the Synbiotic, infected with pathogens or not, had healthier mucosa. In groups infected with pathogens, the frequency and intensity of histopathologic lesions were lessened often in groups treated with the Synbiotic. The Synbiotic group had higher lactic acid bacteria counts than the Control group on day 39, and the isolation frequency of S. Typhimurium was lower (p < 0.05) in the Synbiotic-treated groups. On day 18, mucosa, villi, villi-crypt ratio, crypt, and feed intake were influenced by Enterobacteriaceae. However, on day 39 (end of the trial), those parameters were influenced by lactic acid bacteria. The Synbiotic influenced morphological modifications in the duodenal mucosa, which in turn gave the broilers the ability to resist infections caused by S. Typhimurium and C. perfringens, by inhibiting their growth and decreasing the intensity and frequency of histopathological injuries. View Full-Text
Keywords: concurrent colonization; probiotic; prebiotic; broiler; Salmonella Typhimurium; Clostridium perfringens; intestinal mucosa concurrent colonization; probiotic; prebiotic; broiler; Salmonella Typhimurium; Clostridium perfringens; intestinal mucosa
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MDPI and ACS Style

Villagrán-de la Mora, Z.; Nuño, K.; Vázquez-Paulino, O.; Avalos, H.; Castro-Rosas, J.; Gómez-Aldapa, C.; Angulo, C.; Ascencio, F.; Villarruel-López, A. Effect of a Synbiotic Mix on Intestinal Structural Changes, and Salmonella Typhimurium and Clostridium Perfringens Colonization in Broiler Chickens. Animals 2019, 9, 777. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9100777

AMA Style

Villagrán-de la Mora Z, Nuño K, Vázquez-Paulino O, Avalos H, Castro-Rosas J, Gómez-Aldapa C, Angulo C, Ascencio F, Villarruel-López A. Effect of a Synbiotic Mix on Intestinal Structural Changes, and Salmonella Typhimurium and Clostridium Perfringens Colonization in Broiler Chickens. Animals. 2019; 9(10):777. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9100777

Chicago/Turabian Style

Villagrán-de la Mora, Zuamí, Karla Nuño, Olga Vázquez-Paulino, Hugo Avalos, Javier Castro-Rosas, Carlos Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos Angulo, Felipe Ascencio, and Angélica Villarruel-López. 2019. "Effect of a Synbiotic Mix on Intestinal Structural Changes, and Salmonella Typhimurium and Clostridium Perfringens Colonization in Broiler Chickens" Animals 9, no. 10: 777. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9100777

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