Next Article in Journal
The Use of a Virtual Online Debating Platform to Facilitate Student Discussion of Potentially Polarising Topics
Next Article in Special Issue
Assessment of Clicker Training for Shelter Cats
Previous Article in Journal
Understanding Animal Detection of Precursor Earthquake Sounds
Previous Article in Special Issue
Stated Preferences for Dog Characteristics and Sources of Acquisition
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Animals 2017, 7(9), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani7090067

Characteristics and Outcomes of Dogs Admitted into Queensland RSPCA Shelters

1,†,* , 1,2,†
,
1,3
and
1,4
1
School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD 4343, Australia
2
Australian Pet Welfare Foundation, Kenmore, QLD 4069, Australia
3
Jemora Pty Ltd, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia
4
RSPCA, Wacol, QLD 4076, Australia
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 June 2017 / Revised: 11 August 2017 / Accepted: 25 August 2017 / Published: 1 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Sheltering)
Full-Text   |   PDF [945 KB, uploaded 22 September 2017]   |  

Abstract

Over 200,000 stray and surrendered dogs are admitted to shelters and municipal facilities in Australia each year, and approximately 20% are euthanized. Contemporary, comprehensive data on the characteristics and outcomes of dogs entering shelters are required to reduce shelter admissions and euthanasia. However, there are currently limited up-to-date data published on dog admission into shelters. A retrospective single cohort study was conducted to describe the characteristics and outcomes of the dog population entering Royal Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Queensland (RSPCA-QLD) shelters in 2014 (n = 11,967). The majority of dog admissions were strays from the public (24%) or from municipal councils (34%). Just over a quarter of admissions were puppies, 18% of adults (>6 months) were desexed, and the majority of admissions were crossbred dogs (92%). The majority of owner surrenders (86%) were due to human-related reasons. Most dogs were reclaimed (32%) or adopted (43%) and aggression was the most common reason for euthanasia of adult dogs (45%). Low-cost or free desexing and identification programs targeted to areas and breeds contributing to high intake, and increased support services for owners at risk of surrendering their dog, should be trialed to determine their cost effectiveness in reducing shelter admissions and euthanasia. View Full-Text
Keywords: dog; shelter; RSPCA; Queensland; admission source; outcomes; characteristics; stray; surrendered; adopted; euthanized; microchip; identification; breed; desexed dog; shelter; RSPCA; Queensland; admission source; outcomes; characteristics; stray; surrendered; adopted; euthanized; microchip; identification; breed; desexed
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Hemy, M.; Rand, J.; Morton, J.; Paterson, M. Characteristics and Outcomes of Dogs Admitted into Queensland RSPCA Shelters. Animals 2017, 7, 67.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Animals EISSN 2076-2615 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top