Next Article in Journal
Effects of Increased Vigilance for Locomotion Disorders on Lameness and Production in Dairy Cows
Next Article in Special Issue
A Framework to Evaluate Wildlife Feeding in Research, Wildlife Management, Tourism and Recreation
Previous Article in Journal
Understanding Vocalization Might Help to Assess Stressful Conditions in Piglets
Previous Article in Special Issue
Behavior and Characteristics of Sap-Feeding North Island kākā (Nestor meridionalis septentrionalis) in Wellington, New Zealand
Open AccessArticle

Local Attitudes towards Bear Management after Illegal Feeding and Problem Bear Activity

Animal Welfare Program, University of British Columbia, 2357 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Animals 2013, 3(3), 935-950; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani3030935
Received: 25 July 2013 / Revised: 5 September 2013 / Accepted: 5 September 2013 / Published: 12 September 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Wildlife Management)
The “pot bears” received international media attention in 2010 after police discovered the intentional feeding of over 20 black bears during the investigation of an alleged marijuana-growing operation in Christina Lake, British Columbia, Canada. A two-phase random digit dialing survey of the community was conducted in 2011 to understand local perspectives on bear policy and management, before and after a summer of problem bear activity and government interventions. Of the 159 households surveyed in February 2011, most had neutral or positive attitudes towards bears in general, and supported the initial decision to feed the food-conditioned bears until the autumn hibernation. In contrast to wildlife experts however, most participants supported relocating the problem bears, or allowing them to remain in the area, ahead of killing; in part this arose from notions of fairness despite the acknowledged problems of relocation. Most locals were aware of the years of feeding but did not report it, evidently failing to see it as a serious form of harm, even after many bears had been killed. This underscores the importance of preventive action on wildlife feeding and the need to narrow the gap between public and expert opinion on the likely effects of relocation versus killing. View Full-Text
Keywords: attitudes; black bear; British Columbia; Christina Lake; food-conditioned; human-wildlife conflict; intentional feeding; telephone survey attitudes; black bear; British Columbia; Christina Lake; food-conditioned; human-wildlife conflict; intentional feeding; telephone survey
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Dubois, S.; Fraser, D. Local Attitudes towards Bear Management after Illegal Feeding and Problem Bear Activity. Animals 2013, 3, 935-950. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani3030935

AMA Style

Dubois S, Fraser D. Local Attitudes towards Bear Management after Illegal Feeding and Problem Bear Activity. Animals. 2013; 3(3):935-950. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani3030935

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dubois, Sara; Fraser, David. 2013. "Local Attitudes towards Bear Management after Illegal Feeding and Problem Bear Activity" Animals 3, no. 3: 935-950. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani3030935

Find Other Styles

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Only visits after 24 November 2015 are recorded.
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop