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Article

Platelet Lysate for Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Culture in the Canine and Equine Species: Analogous but Not the Same

1
Equine Clinic (Surgery, Orthopedics), Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, 35390 Giessen, Germany
2
Saxon Incubator for Clinical Translation (SIKT), University of Leipzig, 04109 Leipzig, Germany
3
Small Animal Clinic (Surgery), Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, 35390 Giessen, Germany
4
Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Small Animal Clinic, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, 35390 Giessen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editors: Eleonora Iacono and Barbara Merlo
Animals 2022, 12(2), 189; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12020189
Received: 8 December 2021 / Revised: 5 January 2022 / Accepted: 10 January 2022 / Published: 13 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stem Cells in Domestic Animals: Applications in Health and Production)
Regenerative medicine using platelet-based blood products or adult stem cells offers the prospect of better clinical outcomes with many diseases. In veterinary medicine, most progress has been made with the development and therapeutic use of these regenerative therapeutics in horses, but the clinical need is given in dogs as well. Our aim was to transfer previous advances in the development of horse regenerative therapeutics, specifically the use of platelet lysate for feeding stem cell cultures, to the dog. Here, we describe the scalable production of canine platelet lysate, which could be used in regenerative biological therapies. We also evaluated the canine platelet lysate for its suitability in feeding canine stem cell cultures in comparison to equine platelet lysate used for equine stem cell cultures. Platelet lysate production from canine blood was successful, but the platelet lysate did not support stem cell culture in dogs in the same beneficial way observed with the equine platelet lysate and stem cells. In conclusion, canine platelet lysate can be produced in large scales as described here, but further research is needed to improve the cultivation of canine stem cells.
Platelet lysate (PL) is an attractive platelet-based therapeutic tool and has shown promise as xeno-free replacement for fetal bovine serum (FBS) in human and equine mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) culture. Here, we established a scalable buffy-coat-based protocol for canine PL (cPL) production (n = 12). The cPL was tested in canine adipose MSC (n = 5) culture compared to FBS. For further comparison, equine adipose MSC (n = 5) were cultured with analogous equine PL (ePL) or FBS. During canine blood processing, platelet and transforming growth factor-β1 concentrations increased (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001), while white blood cell concentrations decreased (p < 0.05). However, while equine MSC showed good results when cultured with 10% ePL, canine MSC cultured with 2.5% or 10% cPL changed their morphology and showed decreased metabolic activity (p < 0.05). Apoptosis and necrosis in canine MSC were increased with 2.5% cPL (p < 0.05). Surprisingly, passage 5 canine MSC showed less genetic aberrations after culture with 10% cPL than with FBS. Our data reveal that using analogous canine and equine biologicals does not entail the same results. The buffy-coat-based cPL was not adequate for canine MSC culture, but may still be useful for therapeutic applications. View Full-Text
Keywords: platelet lysate; canine; mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC); equine; cell fitness platelet lysate; canine; mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC); equine; cell fitness
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hagen, A.; Holland, H.; Brandt, V.-P.; Doll, C.U.; Häußler, T.C.; Melzer, M.; Moellerberndt, J.; Lehmann, H.; Burk, J. Platelet Lysate for Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Culture in the Canine and Equine Species: Analogous but Not the Same. Animals 2022, 12, 189. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12020189

AMA Style

Hagen A, Holland H, Brandt V-P, Doll CU, Häußler TC, Melzer M, Moellerberndt J, Lehmann H, Burk J. Platelet Lysate for Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Culture in the Canine and Equine Species: Analogous but Not the Same. Animals. 2022; 12(2):189. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12020189

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hagen, Alina, Heidrun Holland, Vivian-Pascal Brandt, Carla U. Doll, Thomas C. Häußler, Michaela Melzer, Julia Moellerberndt, Hendrik Lehmann, and Janina Burk. 2022. "Platelet Lysate for Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Culture in the Canine and Equine Species: Analogous but Not the Same" Animals 12, no. 2: 189. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12020189

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