Next Article in Journal
Changes of Plasma Fatty Acids in Four Lipid Classes to Understand Energy Metabolism at Different Levels of Non-Esterified Fatty Acid (NEFA) in Dairy Cows
Previous Article in Journal
Effects of Dietary Doum Palm Fruit Powder on Growth, Antioxidant Capacity, Immune Response, and Disease Resistance of African Catfish, Clarias gariepinus (B.)
Open AccessArticle

The Effects of Broiler Breeder Dietary Vitamin E and Egg Storage Time on the Quality of Eggs and Newly Hatched Chicks

Institute of Animal Nutrition, Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, 211 Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu 611130, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Animals 2020, 10(8), 1409; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10081409
Received: 19 July 2020 / Revised: 4 August 2020 / Accepted: 5 August 2020 / Published: 13 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Animal Nutrition)
Broiler breeder dietary vitamin E supplementation has been indicated to enhance the antioxidant status of egg yolks, embryos, and newly hatched chicks. However, knowledge of the relationships involving breeder dietary vitamin E, the egg storage time, and the quality of the eggs and newly hatched chicks in poultry, especially in broiler breeders, is still limited. Here, we aimed to provide important evidence regarding broiler breeder dietary vitamin E and egg storage time intervention in egg characteristics and hatchability and the antioxidant status of the egg yolks and newly hatched chicks. Our results showed that prolonged egg storage time (14 vs. 0 d) increased the embryonic mortality, decreased the hatchability, and impaired the antioxidant status of egg yolks and newly hatched chicks, while increasing the broiler breeder dietary vitamin E levels (100 vs. 6 mg/kg) improved the livability of embryos and the antioxidant status of newly hatched chicks in the case of long-term egg storage. These findings suggested that broiler breeder dietary vitamin E could be applied in extending the storage time of breeder eggs.
This study was conducted to investigate the effects of broiler breeder dietary vitamin E and egg storage time on the egg characteristics, hatchability, and antioxidant status of the egg yolks and newly hatched chicks. A total of 512 71-week-old Ross 308 breeder hens were fed the same basic diets containing 6 or 100 mg/kg vitamin E for 12 weeks. During this time, a total of 1532, 1464, and 1316 eggs were independently collected at weeks 8, 10, and 12, respectively, and subsequently stored for 0 or 14 d before hatching. The outcomes from three trials showed that prolonged egg storage time (14 vs. 0 d) negatively affected (p < 0.05) the egg characteristics, hatchability traits, and the yolk total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) (p < 0.05). Chicks derived from the stored eggs exhibited higher malonaldehyde (MDA) and T-AOC in the serum and yolk sac (p < 0.05). Broiler breeder dietary vitamin E (100 vs. 6 mg/kg) increased (p < 0.05) the hatchability and the antioxidant status of the yolks as indicated by a higher α-tocopherol content and T-AOC and lower MDA level (p < 0.05). The supplementation of vitamin E also remarkably increased (p < 0.05) the total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) activity (yolk sac, weeks 8 and 12) and T-AOC (serum, weeks 8, 10, and 12; yolk sac, weeks 8 and 12) and decreased (p < 0.05) the MDA content of chicks (yolk sac, week 10; serum, week 12). Interactions (p < 0.05) were found between the broiler breeder dietary vitamin E and egg storage time on the hatchability and antioxidant status of chick tissues. Broiler breeder dietary vitamin E (100 vs. 6 mg/kg) increased (p < 0.05) the hatchability and the T-AOC in the serum and liver of chicks, and decreased (p < 0.05) the early embryonic mortality and the MDA content in the yolk sacs of chicks derived from eggs stored for 14 d but not for 0 d. In conclusion, prolonged egg storage time (14 vs. 0 d) increased the embryonic mortality, decreased the hatchability, and impaired the antioxidant status of egg yolks and newly hatched chicks, while the addition of broiler breeder dietary vitamin E (100 vs. 6 mg/kg) could partly relieve these adverse impacts induced by long-term egg storage. View Full-Text
Keywords: breeder dietary vitamin E; egg storage; hatchability; antioxidant status breeder dietary vitamin E; egg storage; hatchability; antioxidant status
MDPI and ACS Style

Yang, J.; Ding, X.; Bai, S.; Wang, J.; Zeng, Q.; Peng, H.; Xuan, Y.; Su, Z.; Zhang, K. The Effects of Broiler Breeder Dietary Vitamin E and Egg Storage Time on the Quality of Eggs and Newly Hatched Chicks. Animals 2020, 10, 1409.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop