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Open AccessArticle

Effects of Black Wattle (Acacia mearnsii) Condensed Tannins on Intake, Protozoa Population, Ruminal Fermentation, and Nutrient Digestibility in Jersey Steers

1
Department of Animal Science, State University of Western Parana, Marechal Candido Rondon 85960-000, Brazil
2
Department of Animal Science, State University of Maringa, Maringa 87020-900, Brazil
3
Department of Animal Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Animals 2020, 10(6), 1011; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10061011
Received: 7 May 2020 / Revised: 4 June 2020 / Accepted: 6 June 2020 / Published: 9 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Animal Nutrition)
Condensed tannins are plant secondary compounds that can modulate ruminal fermentation by binding to proteins, reducing their ruminal degradation, and also reduce ruminal protozoa, which may improve the efficiency of nitrogen utilization. In this study, we tested increasing levels (0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 g/kg of diet dry matter) of Acacia mearnsii condensed tannins in the diets of Jersey steers. Condensed tannins did not affect intake and ruminal protozoa population, but reduced protein digestibility and decreased ruminal pH and acetate proportion. Overall, the tested doses of condensed tannins extract did not improve ruminal fermentation and nutrient digestibility.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of inclusion of condensed tannins (CT) from black wattle (Acacia mearnsii) on feed intake, ruminal protozoa population, ruminal fermentation, and nutrient digestibility in Jersey steers. Five ruminally-cannulated steers were used in a 5 × 5 Latin square design, with five periods of 20 days each (14 days for diet adaptation and six days for sample collection per period). Treatments were composed of dietary inclusion levels of condensed tannins at 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 g/kg of diet dry matter. Intakes of dry matter, organic matter, ether extract, crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and total digestible nutrients were not affected by condensed tannins. The ruminal pH was reduced linearly with tannin levels. Ruminal ammonia nitrogen concentration was not affected by tannins. Tannins reduced the molar proportion of acetate and did not affect the ruminal protozoal population, which might be related to the low doses used. Digestibilities of dry matter, organic matter, and neutral detergent fiber were not altered; however, there was a linear reduction in crude protein digestibility. Based on these results, CT extracts from black wattle are not recommended for improving nutrient utilization in steers at the tested levels. View Full-Text
Keywords: additives; digestibility; intake; polyphenols; secondary compounds additives; digestibility; intake; polyphenols; secondary compounds
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Avila, A.S.; Zambom, M.A.; Faccenda, A.; Fischer, M.L.; Anschau, F.A.; Venturini, T.; Tinini, R.C.R.; Dessbesell, J.G.; Faciola, A.P. Effects of Black Wattle (Acacia mearnsii) Condensed Tannins on Intake, Protozoa Population, Ruminal Fermentation, and Nutrient Digestibility in Jersey Steers. Animals 2020, 10, 1011.

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