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Article

Feeding Agroindustrial Byproducts to Light Lambs: Influence on Growth Performance, Diet Digestibility, Nitrogen Balance, Ruminal Fermentation, and Plasma Metabolites

1
Departamento de Producción Agraria, ETSIAAB, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid, Spain
2
Departamento de Producción Animal, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Animals 2020, 10(4), 600; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10040600
Received: 15 March 2020 / Revised: 29 March 2020 / Accepted: 30 March 2020 / Published: 1 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste and/or By-Products Use in the “Circular Economy” Idea)
Feeding agroindustrial byproducts to ruminants can have multiple benefits, such as lowering feeding costs, reducing competition with human food, decreasing environmental impact associated with byproducts disposal, and improving the quality of animal products. In order to use these byproducts in practical feeding, their effects on animal performance and health should be assessed. In this study, we evaluated the effect of replacing 44% of conventional feeds in a high-cereal concentrate for light lambs with three byproducts: Corn distiller’s dried grains with solubles (18%), dried citrus pulp (18%), and exhausted olive cake (8%), all of which are highly produced in the Mediterranean area. We observed that the inclusion of these byproducts did not affect feed intake, growth performance, ruminal fermentation (with exception of NH3-N concentrations), or plasma metabolites in growing lambs. Compared with the high-cereal concentrate, feeding the concentrate including the byproducts resulted in a reduction of potentially human-edible ingredients from 64.4% to 38.7%. In conclusion, 44% of cereal grains and protein feeds in the concentrate for light lambs can be replaced with a mixture of corn distiller’s dried grains with solubles, dried citrus pulp, and exhausted olive cake without negatively affecting growing performance and animal health.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of replacing cereals and protein concentrates in a high-cereal concentrate (control) for light lambs with corn distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS; 18%), dried citrus pulp (DCP; 18%), and exhausted olive cake (EOC; 8%) in a byproduct (BYP) concentrate on growth performance, digestibility, ruminal fermentation, and plasma metabolites. Two homogeneous groups of Lacaune lambs (13.8 kg ± 0.25 kg) were fed one of each concentrates and barley straw ad libitum until reaching about 26 kg body weight. There were no differences between groups on feed intake, average daily gain, or feed conversion ratio, but the control diet had greater (p < 0.001) dry matter digestibility. Diet had no effect on post-mortem ruminal pH and total volatile fatty acid concentrations and profile, but NH3-N concentrations were lower (p = 0.003) for the BYP-fed group compared with the control one. However, plasma concentrations of amino acids, total proteins, urea, and hepatic enzymes were not affected by the diet. In conclusion, 44% of feed ingredients in the concentrate for light lambs can be replaced with a mixture of corn DDGS, DCP, and EOC without negatively affecting growing performance and animal health. View Full-Text
Keywords: light lambs; corn DDGS; citrus pulp; exhausted olive cake; growth performance; amino acids light lambs; corn DDGS; citrus pulp; exhausted olive cake; growth performance; amino acids
MDPI and ACS Style

de Evan, T.; Cabezas, A.; de la Fuente, J.; Carro, M.D. Feeding Agroindustrial Byproducts to Light Lambs: Influence on Growth Performance, Diet Digestibility, Nitrogen Balance, Ruminal Fermentation, and Plasma Metabolites. Animals 2020, 10, 600. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10040600

AMA Style

de Evan T, Cabezas A, de la Fuente J, Carro MD. Feeding Agroindustrial Byproducts to Light Lambs: Influence on Growth Performance, Diet Digestibility, Nitrogen Balance, Ruminal Fermentation, and Plasma Metabolites. Animals. 2020; 10(4):600. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10040600

Chicago/Turabian Style

de Evan, Trinidad, Almudena Cabezas, Jesús de la Fuente, and María D. Carro 2020. "Feeding Agroindustrial Byproducts to Light Lambs: Influence on Growth Performance, Diet Digestibility, Nitrogen Balance, Ruminal Fermentation, and Plasma Metabolites" Animals 10, no. 4: 600. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10040600

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