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Open AccessCommentary

Progress in Veterinary Behavior in North America: The Case of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists

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Veterinary Behavior Consultations, 253 S. Graeser Rd., St. Louis, MO 63141, USA
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Department of Clinical Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Animals 2020, 10(3), 536; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10030536
Received: 14 January 2020 / Revised: 19 March 2020 / Accepted: 19 March 2020 / Published: 24 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fundamentals of Clinical Animal Behaviour)
The American College of Veterinary Behaviorists is a specialty group within the American Veterinary Medical Association. It was formed by eight veterinarians and has grown ten-fold in the following decades. The specialty ensures that those who are its diplomates have taken the training, seen hundreds of cases, published research on animal behavior, and successfully passed an examination so the public can be assured that their animal will get the best treatment for its behavior problem.
The American College of Veterinary Behavior has grown in number and in expertise over the past quarter century. There are now 86 diplomates, at least three textbooks on treating behavior problems, and a text on veterinary psychopharmacology. Although veterinary behavior began in veterinary colleges, the majority of residents are now trained in non-conforming programs. Many more diplomates practice privately in specialty clinics or as separate businesses. Progress has been made in both diagnosis and treatment with polypharmacy, resulting in successful outcomes for many dogs and cats suffering from separation anxiety, fear, or aggression. View Full-Text
Keywords: clinical behavior problems; board certification; specialization clinical behavior problems; board certification; specialization
MDPI and ACS Style

Horwitz, D.; Houpt, K.A. Progress in Veterinary Behavior in North America: The Case of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists. Animals 2020, 10, 536.

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