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Article

Short-Term Effect of the Inclusion of Silage Artichoke By-Products in Diets of Dairy Goats on Milk Quality

1
Departamento de Tecnología Agroalimentaria, Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche, 03312 Alicante, Spain
2
Dipartimento di Agraria, Sezione di Scienze Zootecniche, Università degli studi di Sassari, 07100 Sassari, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Animals 2020, 10(2), 339; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10020339
Received: 23 January 2020 / Revised: 17 February 2020 / Accepted: 19 February 2020 / Published: 21 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Small Ruminants)
The use of artichoke by-products, both from the canning industry or from the stubble that remains in the field, provides a cheaper source of nutrients, suitable for ruminant feeding due to their ability to digest fibre-rich foods. The use of these by-products for animal feed is also a way to reduce waste caused by the canning industry and disposal costs, as well as the area and resources allocated to the production of food for livestock, contributing to the circular economy. Evaluating the effect of the inclusion of silage artichoke by-products (bracts and rest of crop plant) in dairy goat rations on the milk yield and composition, animal health status, mineral and lipid profile is an effective way to explore the suitability of these alternative feedstuffs for goat cattle. The use of artichoke bracts and whole plant silage in dairy goat diets does not lead to marked differences in the milk yield and quality or the animals’ health status. From a nutritional point of view for human health, slightly better mineral and lipid profiles are observed in milk from goats fed artichoke plant silage, due to its higher polyunsaturated fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid contents.
Artichoke by-products represent a high amount of waste whose removal entails several costs. Moreover, feed is the main cost in a farm. So, including these by-products in ruminant diets would lower feed costs. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of two levels of inclusion, 12.5% and 25.0%, of two silages of artichoke by-products (artichoke bracts, AB and artichoke plant, AP) in the diet of goats on the milk yield, composition and quality and on the metabolic profile of the animals. AB presented the lowest blood urea content and there were no differences in milk yield in the two experiments. However, with 25.0% of silage by-product in the diet, a higher fat content was observed in AB and of protein in AP, as well as this treatment showing a slightly higher Se content. Regarding the milk lipid profile, milk from 12.5% of AP treatment presented a higher PUFA content. In conclusion, the use of silage artichoke by-products in dairy goat diets does not jeopardise milk yield and quality and health status of animals and, from a nutritional point of view for human health, a slightly better mineral and lipid profile is observed in milk from AP treatments. View Full-Text
Keywords: silage; lipid profile; minerals; metabolic profile silage; lipid profile; minerals; metabolic profile
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MDPI and ACS Style

Monllor, P.; Romero, G.; Sendra, E.; Atzori, A.S.; Díaz, J.R. Short-Term Effect of the Inclusion of Silage Artichoke By-Products in Diets of Dairy Goats on Milk Quality. Animals 2020, 10, 339. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10020339

AMA Style

Monllor P, Romero G, Sendra E, Atzori AS, Díaz JR. Short-Term Effect of the Inclusion of Silage Artichoke By-Products in Diets of Dairy Goats on Milk Quality. Animals. 2020; 10(2):339. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10020339

Chicago/Turabian Style

Monllor, Paula, Gema Romero, Esther Sendra, Alberto S. Atzori, and José R. Díaz 2020. "Short-Term Effect of the Inclusion of Silage Artichoke By-Products in Diets of Dairy Goats on Milk Quality" Animals 10, no. 2: 339. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10020339

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